Theories of Ice and Fire: Bran’s Future and the Fate of Jojen Reed

bloodraven

By Locke

Welcome to a new recurring feature exploring popular theories from A Song of Ice and Fire! Guest contributor Locke will walk us through their context and nuances, and how changes in Game of Thrones may have impacted them.

This post will focus on Bran’s future and the mysterious fate of Jojen Reed, looking at the implications of Jojen’s death in the Season 4 finale. With recent developments in the show and Bran finally reaching the mysterious Three-Eyed Raven, we’d like to discuss the potentially far-reaching consequences of this theory in detail.

As with all future posts, this discussion will rely on close analysis of the text and will naturally be filled with MAJOR BOOK AND SHOW SPOILERS. Let’s move ahead…

 

To begin with, it’s important to note that in the books, Jojen was not murdered by the wights. In fact, most people think he is still alive, as we have not been told otherwise. At the end of A Dance With Dragons, we last see Jojen standing alone, staring out of the cave entrance. However, there is a theory that has gathered some momentum that Jojen has actually died in the books too, albeit behind the scenes. This slightly unnerving theory is known as ‘Jojen Paste’.

To summarise, Bran is given some weirwood paste in his final chapter in A Dance With Dragons, which looks and (initially) tastes like blood. He is told by Bloodraven that consuming the paste will awaken his gifts and wed him to the trees (Bran III, A Dance With Dragons, p.531). We are not specifically told what these powers might be, though we have some idea, given Bran’s visions that spread across different periods in time through the eyes of the weirwoods.

Some believe that by this point Jojen has been murdered by the Children of the Forest who inhabit the cave, due to several potential clues in the text, and that his blood has been mixed into the paste, as a form of blood sacrifice – enhancing Bran’s abilities. Crazy, right? Well, perhaps not as crazy as it sounds. Let’s present the evidence:

Bran’s third and final chapter in A Dance With Dragons is filled with an ominous, ever-present sense of foreboding. The language used by Martin is intentionally unsettling. The chapter begins with a phrase describing the moon, which is repeated throughout to denote the passing of time:

“The moon was a crescent, thin and sharp as the blade of a knife.” (ADWD, p.521)

and later:

“The moon was a black hole in the sky.” (ADWD, p.523)

and

“The moon was fat and full.” (ADWD, p.526)

We see Jojen telling Bran how he will soon discover the “secrets of the old gods,” but strangely Jojen “seemed sadder now, sullen, with a weary, haunted look about the eyes.” And this psychological turn for the worse comes despite being physically healthier: “Food and fire and rest had helped restore him after the ordeals of their journey.” (ADWD, p.522)

Now we know since A Clash Of Kings that Jojen claims to know the day of his death, saying to Bran and Meera “This not the day I die” early on. (A Clash of Kings, p.302). He then states cryptically in that final A Dance With Dragons chapter: “My task was to get you here. My part in this is done” (ADWD, p.523).

Later that chapter, after some time has passed, Bran speaks with Jojen again, who now seems to be preoccupied with death in relation to weirwoods, and what happened to the ‘singers of the forest’ after they died:

“When they died, they went into the wood, into leaf and limb and root, and the trees remembered…when singers die they become part of that godhood.” (ADWD, p.526)

This is followed by the most sinister aspect of their conversation:

“Bran’s eyes widened. ‘They’re going to kill me?’
‘No,’ Meera said, ‘Jojen, you’re scaring him.’
‘He is not the one who needs to be afraid.'” (ADWD, p.526)

What is Jojen hinting at here? The clues seem to point to something approaching, something that one of them should fear – and that indeed it seems – Jojen himself fears. And if he has in fact seen the day of his death, perhaps this is the cause of that state of mind. Something is making Jojen act differently in this chapter, for sure.

Next comes this clue about the food they are eating down in the caves:

“Almost every day they ate blood stew…Jojen thought it might be squirrel meat and Meera said that it was rat. Bran did not care. It was meat and it was good.” (ADWD, p.527)

Why is GRRM giving us these seemingly insignificant details? Is this foreshadowing of the nature of the Jojen paste, and of Bran’s obliviousness to what it is he might be eating? Note also the use of ‘blood stew’ – a strange turn of phrase for what is usually merely called ‘stew’. What’s more, the mysterious ‘blood stew’ is made even more peculiar by the fact that in the cave, there are bones strewn around on the ground:

“The floor of the passage was littered with the bones of birds and beasts. But there were other bones as well, big ones that must have come from giants and small ones that could have been from children. On either side of them, in niches carved from the stone, skulls looked down on them.” (Bran II, ADWD, p.205)

Are these simply the bones of trespassers to the cave or could some be the results of previous sacrifices?

The Child of the Forest known as ‘Leaf’ describes the mix as a “paste of weirwood seeds,” but Bran regards it uncertainly. Here is the description of the paste that Bran eats, which is served up in a carved weirwood bowl (itself significant, as we will see):

“Inside was a white paste, with dark red veins running through it…Something about the look of it made Bran feel ill. The red veins were only weirwood sap, he supposed, but in the torchlight they looked remarkably like blood.” (ADWD, p.531)

Then, eating it:

“It had a bitter taste, though not so bitter as acorn paste. The first spoonful was the hardest to get down. He almost retched it right back up. The second tasted better. The third was almost sweet. The rest he spooned up eagerly. Why had he thought that it was bitter?” (ADWD, p.532)

Now just preceding this event, Jojen has been described as growing “ever more sullen and solitary,” climbing up to the mouth of the cave each day just to stand and stare there for hours, shivering in the wind. Of this behaviour, Meera explains to Bran that Jojen “wants to go home,” that “he will not even try and fight his fate,” and “he says the greendreams do not lie.” She then cuts herself short:

“I hoped that when we found your three eyed crow… now I wonder why we ever came.” (ADWD, p.530)

This passage is cryptic and seems to contradict itself: does Jojen, or indeed Meera, believe they can really get home, given how little food or supplies they now have and how close to death Jojen came to on the way there? Surely not. So in saying that he won’t try and fight his fate, is Meera talking about Jojen’s earlier self-professed belief that his death will be at Greywater Watch, or indeed a different, imminent death that may await him? Did Meera really expect them to return home once they found the three-eyed crow? Perhaps Meera is aware that Jojen’s death is imminent, and wants to get him home to safety – she wants him to fight his fate by leaving. This remains unclear, but what we do know is that at the close of the chaper, after Bran has eaten the paste, the Reeds are nowhere to be found:

“He had hoped that Meera and Jojen would be there, so he could tell them what he had seen, but their snug alcove in the rock was cold and empty.” (ADWD, p.534)

Bran then has a vision, in which a man is murdered before a weirwood tree, ending the chapter with these words:

“As his life flowed out of him in a red tide, Brandon Stark could taste the blood.” (ADWD, p.536)

Now this vision hints directly at a form of blood-sacrifice having taken place before the Winterfell weirwood tree, which is perhaps directly tapping into the trees’ otherworldly powers and the powers of the Old Gods – explaining Bran’s ability to taste the blood and of course, see and communicate through the weirwoods. However, it also ties in with the paste, which looked like blood, was served in a carved weirwood bowl, and tasted bitter. This taken along with the description of the moon that looks “thin and sharp as the blade of a knife” – a phrase that occurs three times throughout the chapter – demonstrates ominous hints of death throughout. Could Jojen have become one of the necessary sacrifices to give Bran his powers? And what’s more, might Jojen have known this day was coming?

If so, this might explain the show’s decision to kill off Jojen by the wights: it is more of an action-packed, dramatic send-off. And perhaps more crucially, Jojen’s importance to the story would essentially be concluded at this point. 

But let’s stretch this theory a bit wider with some further evidence and context, and indeed the implications this has upon Bran’s storyline:

Strangely, A Dance With Dragons is a book filled with cannibalism: see “Frey pies,” Varamyr‘s brutal prologue, Rickon Stark being on Skagos, an island of cannibals, and the several references in Asha Greyjoy‘s chapters to cannibalism in Stannis’ ranks. Join that with all the potential references in this one Bran chapter alone to blood and eating and it becomes positively creepy. The exaggeration of this theme by GRRM does not seem coincidental.

Now as noted by Efilnikufesin at Westeros.org, in the appendix of A Dance With Dragons, one of the listed Children of the Forest is called ‘Blackknife’. This seems unusual, especially given the prominence of the word ‘knife’ throughout the chapter. Perhaps this ‘Blackknife’ is in charge of blood sacrifices? And we already know that obsidian daggers are black… Hang on, you ask. Would the Children of the Forest really murder a child? What about guest right? Would this not be a terrible violation of a law that is in fact a law of the Old Gods? Well, no, I would argue, not if the guest is a willing participant in what he perceives as his own, necessary sacrifice to grant Bran the full extent of his powers.

What’s more, the very fact that weirwoods have sap that looks uncannily like blood has been referenced throughout the series, and perhaps there is a very direct reason for this: that the two are linked. Perhaps such sacrifices do give the trees their power: it is what the trees feed on, not unlike the belief that R’hllor the Red God receives his power from the ritual burning of men, and from the leeches that are literally filled with blood. What is so wildly different between the use of blood in these two faiths? Such a theory is only given further credence by looking at various weirwoods around Westeros: a huge weirwood resides in White Harbor, which has been literally surrounded by death, whereas no weirwood grows in the Vale: perhaps because all potential “sacrifices” there are hurled out of the Moon Door.

If this is so, we see a more sinister side to the Old Gods and to the mysterious character of Bloodraven. Indeed, this involvement of blood sacrifice makes us question the moral integrity of the Northern beliefs. But as we know with this series, nothing is ever black and white. Even if Bloodraven is working towards a morally virtuous endgame, perhaps such strategies involve dark tactics for the “greater good”. Such a stance ties in directly with Melisandre‘s world-view, who also believes she is working toward a salvation for all people by sacrificing a mere few.

So remains these questions: just what does Bloodraven want with Bran? Was Jojen’s blood in the paste? Why would Jojen potentially sacrifice his life to get Bran to this position?

What do you think? Let us know in the comments and feel free to mention ideas you would like to see in future posts.

References:

A Song Of Ice And Fire Wikipedia
Game of Thrones Wiki
George RR Martin: A Game Of Thrones, A Clash Of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Dance With Dragons
Thanks to Westeros.org users: Efilnikufesin, Wouter and J_Crews for their insights.

(Image source: HBO)

74 responses

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    1. I’d considered and then disregarded this theory in the past, but this was very well-argued. I particularly like the point about whether there’s actually a lot of blood sacrifice associated with the weirwoods.

      Great new feature, I look forward to more!

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    2. I like to think that Jojen did not volunteer for his death and that the children of the Forest outright murdered him. Maybe we will have “Meera Paste” on the show. Also, in the “Darth Maul White Walker” episode we see several shadowy figures amidst the Whitewalkers. Methinks those are children of the forest who are Allied with the Whitewalkers in an attempt to reclaim their homeland.

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    3. Quiddity:
      My favorite tin foil theory out of all of ASOIAF!

      I would love a whole post on the really crackpot stuff that might not have enough evidence for a full article on their own- my personal favorite is that Daario is the real Aegon.

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    4. There’s really very little textual evidence to go on, but yeah, the show elevates this theory into the category of “possible, if unlikely”.

      Still, they could have just gotten rid of an actor who wouldn’t have justified his “pay per minute of screentime-ratio” in coming seasons.

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    5. Such a dark, rich, thick, savory and bloody good analysis. The CotF are no strangers to the blood of the land, obviously using it wisely and recycling it prudently. Are R’hlorr and the Old Gods intertwined in some way, possibly via some Tower of Babel-like interpretation of each other? Blackknife (obsidian is key) is an excellent highlight.

      No wonder the CotF have bonded with BLOODraven. Maybe not so superficially? I really would like to know how they came to be so aligned….

      Poor Jojen, (awfully sudden way to go in the show)….his sacrifice in ADwD may be bloody indeed but is he really dead? Perhaps he just donated to the CotF Red Cross to strengthen Bran? Maybe Meera and Jojen have more in store for us, possibly with the help of CH?

      Fascinating read. Thank you very much.

      krtmd,

      Yes! And they initially thought it was wild pig before becoming suspicious. Summer knows….

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    6. I was really hoping that we would start to see pieces like this on the site. Castings and filming is nice, but something different is always good, especially analysis as it provides us with a launchpad to get some really good discussion going on here. Hopefully it might bring some new people to the site as well because this site deserves to be seen by more people (although it does seem to be still growing anyway, as the number of comments on the ‘big’ articles has increased on average).

      As for this first one, well it certainly was excellent. I had obviously heard of the ‘Jojen paste’ theory, but I deemed it a bit too crackpot to really look into. I thought this article provided a very strong argument for its possibility, and now I would say there is a chance that it is true, but I’m still not sure (George, hurry up we need to know!)

      Perhaps the reason Kristian Nairn isn’t in Season 5 is because we will be seeing Hodor paste (as well as Meera paste). I do struggle to see what they are going to do with Meera and Hodor in future seasons, so maybe this will solve the problem.

      I look forward to reading more posts like this, especially if they are as fantastic as this one. Well Done Locke!

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    7. My first interpretation of that chapter was essentially “oh yeah, I guess that’s how Weirwood paste would look.” I’ve known the gist the theory for a while and didn’t really consider it. But Jojen paste is much more compelling when framed in the broader context of the nature of Weirwood trees; I hadn’t heard that part before. Very nicely tin-foiled!

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    8. This is truly a feature. Never really doubted Jojen paste. The description reminded me of brains. Maybe they lobotomized Jojen and that’s why he stared for hours, shaking uncontrollably.

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    9. I never really wanted to believe that Jojen is dead by the end of DWD. It’s obvious that he’s not gonna make it, the hints have been there since book two but I just never really taught it happened offscreen. But the part that the CotF and the Old Gods rely on blood sacrifices is pretty chilling and it could really turn Bran’s storyline to a very dark place. GRRM can be so ominous sometimes, you’re just never quite sure what is a subtle hint or what is just a simple metaphor.

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    10. That was a pretty awesome synopsis. I had heard this theory but never the evidence behind it so that was pretty cool. And I think I read ADWD much too fast!

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    11. Love this new feature! Great first post!

      I don’t believe the Jojenpaste theory but it was well-argued here. However, the COTF are not cuddly little creatures. They have an agenda – just not sure what it is.

      Jojen knows that his death is imminent, most likely right in that cave. He knows that he will not see his home again. I don’t think that Jojen fears death. He has most likely “seen” the darkness that is coming.

      I worry more for Meera and Hodor because I don’t see a way for them to get back home. I want to believe that Bran gets out of that cave as well. I’ve always hoped that he would end up on the Isle of Faces watching over all of Westeros.

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    12. Or maybe that Hot Pie is the the true heir to the Iron Throne! 😉

      Seriously, this article is well-written and thought provoking.

      Deathdreams:
      I’d like to see a post like this about the many hints throughout the books that Jaime is really a Targarean.

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    13. I had never considered this; very interesting theory, and very well presented.

      Turncloak,

      Methinks those are children of the forest who are Allied with the Whitewalkers in an attempt to reclaim their homeland.

      Mmmm, another interesting idea..

      Jeb,

      ,

      especially analysis as it provides us with a launchpad to get some really good discussion going on here

      .

      Yes, more please!

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    14. It’s a very convincing theory, but when it comes to food and decoration GRRM gives us “seemingly irrelevant information” ALL THE GODDAMN TIME. So I’d remove that as a hint if I were you!

      Btw, did anybody else see Thomas Brodie-Sangster in The Maze Runner? It’s so strange to see him play a boy who’s cheerful in a tough situation.

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    15. If so, this might explain the show’s decision to kill off Jojen by the wights: it is more of an action-packed, dramatic send-off. And perhaps more crucially, Jojen’s importance to the story would essentially be concluded at this point.

      Huh? A ritual sacrifice would have be a far more dramatic send-off.

      Assuming the book theory is true, what reason in seven hells would D&D find for not doing it? It’s an awesome conclusion to Jojen’s story. The TV version death by wight and acorn grenade was disappointing.

      In the show they could have arrived at the 3EC’s tree a few episodes earlier, skipped the Craster’s keep diversion, and spent a couple of episodes leading up to Jojen making the decision to willingly sacrifice himself for Bran’s power-levelling. So they cannot credibly use as an excuse the lack of time in the season to do such a story line, because they’re the ones who wasted time sending Bran to Craster’s.

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    16. Turncloak:
      Methinks those are children of the forest who are Allied with the Whitewalkers in an attempt to reclaim their homeland.

      Anyone who uses “methinks” is automatically wrong though. Sorry, bro. That’s how it is.

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    17. Seeing the plainness of Bloodraven’s appearance on the show makes me nerd rage all over again. When he next shows up, I hope they update his look. Is it that hard to remove one of his eyes using prosthetics? I don’t even care that he isn’t an albino with a birthmark that looks like a raven, but using the phrase “A thousand eyes, and one”(which the show did) makes no god damn sense if he still has both fucking eyes!

      #NOONEUNDERSTAAAANDS!!!!

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    18. So, if Jojen sacrifices for Bran, maybe Bran will sacrifice for… Jon? To reborn Azor Ahai? Would he be a victim which the prophecy told about?

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    19. Lurking for years, but had to come out of the shadows to tell that I really enjoyed reading this article and looking forward to the next in this series.

      Job well done. 🙂

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    20. Theon baratheon
      Interesting idea…
      In correlation to it, I would suggest to recall how often Jon and arya both reflect on one another so fondly. Mussing the hair. The tragedy might fall in with them… Although for jon.. Influencing his decisions.. It already did. We shall see!

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    21. Jeb:
      Perhaps the reason Kristian Nairn isn’t in Season 5 is because we will be seeing Hodor paste (as well as Meera paste). I do struggle to see what they are going to do with Meera and Hodor in future seasons, so maybe this will solve the problem.

      I look forward to reading more posts like this, especially if they are as fantastic as this one. Well Done Locke!

      I’d imagine Meera to play a relatively big part going forwards. This far the story of Bran seems to borrow a lot from a Norse myth where a boy and a girl are the only survivors of the “end” of the world and they survive by running north and hiding under a magical tree in a forest.

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    22. Nice article! Looking forward to the next one!

      Didn’t Kristian Nairn say he’d be back for season 6? No Hodor paste yet. Somehow I would like to think Meera survives all of this and inherits Greywater Watch. GRRM has promised we will meet Howland Reed, I wonder under what context?

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    23. Cumsprite,

      Jojerine

      I think it would be a weak writing decision by GRRM to have Jojen killed off screen and only reveal it as an offhand remark a whole book later. The show having him killed by wights is better than the book’s uncertainty (though I guess that since the show isn’t restricted to Bran’s POV , Jojenpaste would have been much better here).

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    24. Tyrion Pimpslap:
      Seeing the plainness of Bloodraven’s appearance on the show makes me nerd rage all over again. When he next shows up, I hope they update his look. Is it that hard to remove one of his eyes using prosthetics? I don’t even care that he isn’t an albino with a birthmark that looks like a raven, but using the phrase “A thousand eyes, and one”(which the show did) makes no god damn sense if he still has both fucking eyes!

      #NOONEUNDERSTAAAANDS!!!!

      Couldn’t agree more, he’s supposed to look badass, not like Lo Pan with a white wig. None of the other changes on the show bothered me. This was the first time I was disappointed by the show. Hopefully he gets a visual upgrade next season.

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    25. Very well written thank you. I always miss these kind of things when I’m reading the books so it’s useful to have people point them out to me! It seems very plausible.

      I’m wondering if Bran actually becomes the main antagonist in this series, controlling the white walkers and ‘leading’ the fight against the south.

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    26. Theon Baratheon,

      Interesting point. I’ve started to believe that Bran and his powers will be instrumental in moving Jon towards his destiny. Perhaps that’s why D&D did the “meet/not-meet” at Craster’s Keep…to show that these two have a connection.

      I can accept Jojen’s death as part of the Old Gods/COTF blood sacrifice. If this is true, I’m not sure why it was handled differently in the show.

      Jaime’s girl,

      I, too, want to believe that Meera survives. After all she has experienced, it would be a waste to have her die in a cave. Certainly there is a greater purpose for her. Howland remains a mysterious figure. He sends his two children on a journey they are likely not to return from. Why?

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    27. An interesting line from an earlier Bran chapter in ADWD foreshadowing Jojenpaste

      (re: eating the elk that Coldhands butchered for meat)

      “…Meera Reed and Coldhands butchered the brave beast who had carried them so far. He told himself he would not eat, that it was better to go hungry than to feast upon a friend, but in the end he’d eaten twice”

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    28. Marty: Couldn’t agree more, he’s supposed to look badass, not like Lo Pan with a white wig. None of the other changes on the show bothered me. This was the first time I was disappointed by the show. Hopefully he gets a visual upgrade next season.

      Yeah, it would have been amazing and horrifying if they followed the books. He’s supposed to look half a corpse! I imagined him looking like a shriveled peruvian mummy with one red eye. Instead, we got Dumbledore

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    29. Big thanks for all the kind feedback everyone, great to know that people enjoyed this first post.

      I’ll be thinking of some ideas for the next one in the series over the next few days, so let me know which theories you’d particularly like to see discussed!

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    30. Never believed the theory. Very fun to read though.

      azad injejikian,

      He ate Elk :'( I hated that. Elk was a friend. And it is crystal clear as shown above by all clues Bran ate Jojen too. (Well written article *applause*)

      Hodor doesn’t make an appearance in the next season, it is probably because show!CotF didn’t have Jojen parts for the Jojen paste!

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    31. Thanks for this post. Love it when I read well-argumented theories.

      After reading ADWD a was pretty sure Jojen had died or was about to. Didn’t think of Jojen paste, but his physical and later on his state of mind were going down the hill for two books. I almost wished for some relief for him. Of course, the paste is not my idea of putting an end to his misery!

      I would love to see a great post such as this about the Danes and Starfall. After Howland Reed’s whereabouts, what really happened to Ashara and to Arthur and their significance to the story, has always puzzled me, specially after Jon Connington’s reappearance in ADWD. They are mentioned in every single book, by many different characters, and there is always mystery surrounding them.

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    32. Yep I’m a full-on Jojen paste believer – I think that last Bran chapter also mentioned Meera running off suddenly, worried about something – that was what sealed the deal for me!

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    33. Well done. I was a firm believer in the paste theory until the show went in a completely different direction. Either the paste theory is wrong or the show decided that it was too dark a turn for TV (instead we get boring throat slit/ fireball death). Either way it looks like we won’t be seeing it on HBO which is unfortunate.

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    34. spacechampion: Huh?A ritual sacrifice would have be a far more dramatic send-off.

      Assuming the book theory is true, what reason in seven hells would D&D find for not doing it?It’s an awesome conclusion to Jojen’s story.The TV version death by wight and acorn grenade was disappointing.

      In the show they could have arrived at the 3EC’s tree a few episodes earlier, skipped the Craster’s keep diversion, and spent a couple of episodes leading up to Jojen making the decision to willingly sacrifice himself for Bran’s power-levelling.So they cannot credibly use as an excuse the lack of time in the season to do such a story line, because they’re the ones who wasted time sending Bran to Craster’s.

      He did willingly sacrifice himself in the show. The scene in The First of His Name strongly indicated that he had seen a vision of his own death and knew when it would come (similarly to the book, where Jojen says “this is not the day I die” in ACOK with conviction, hinting that he knows what his death will be), but keeps urging Bran to go to the Three-Eyed Raven, making it clear that he considers Bran and his powers far more important than himself.

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    35. Turri:
      Btw, how the show handled Sandor’s non-death pretty much confirms the coming Cleganebowl for me. We’ll see.

      It confirms that Sandor will come back and play an important role in the story. It does not confirm Cleganebowl, especially not the version with Sandor as Champion of the Faith, which makes no sense at all. Sandor may face unGregor one day, but certainly not in that context and not any time soon.

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    36. I take this as another pretty ominous quote from that last Bran chapter:

      “The strongest trees are rooted in the dark places of the earth. Darkness will be your cloak, your shield, your mother’s milk. Darkness will make you strong.” -Bloodraven

      Well, at least Melisandre/Thoros/Moqorro would be pretty suspicious of that type of language. Seems a bit too black and white for ASOIAF to me, like something a Sith lord would say to his apprentice, but nonetheless its there to ponder.

      As to other theories for future discussions, I wouldn’t mind an article about Sandor still being alive, one about the potential relationship between obsidian candles and prophetic visions/dreams, or one about Aegon Targa- I mean-Blackfyre.

      Then again, we could always talk about my favorite pet theory (probably just wishful thinking) that Davos “Balls of Steel” Seaworth is Azor Ahai reborn.

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    37. Great post! Was not a believer, but will now consider it.

      GhostCR:

      I would love to see a great post such as this about the Danes and Starfall. After Howland Reed’s whereabouts, what really happened to Ashara and to Arthur and their significance to the story, has always puzzled me, specially after Jon Connington’s reappearance in ADWD. They are mentioned in every single book, by many different characters, and there is always mystery surrounding them.

      Yes! Please! This^! I have believed from the beginning that the Daynes have something to contribute to the endgame. And that we do not know the truth of Ashara’s tragedy and Jon’s birth and the Daynes are mixed up in all of it!

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    38. Also yes. I too believe the Daynes will come back into the fold..
      I am nervous though for it however..
      Edric was introduced in an arya chapter..
      Arya is amazing and her chapters are my favorite but with her “power”
      I am fearful of her storyline. The path she’ll take and the deeds she will do. At this moment no one is more deadly than her with her combined wArging.

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    39. What a great week at WotW. Thanks for rounding up all the tasty bits of Jojenpaste theory, Locke. Looking forward to many more of these! Almost certain it was the Talisa honeypot theory that first brought me out of the lurkness. 🙂

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    40. wonderfull article. keep’em coming, they’re fun as hell. i think that paste theory would just fit right in with the whole book context so i’m rooting for it. must say that MdK+J=C+J is the most interesting theory for me at the moment. would be cheering all day if that proved to be true in the next books….

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    41. I always love crackpot theories, though I have to admit this one always seemed pretty lame to me. I have no problem believing that Jojen’s gonna die a pretty unpleasant death, and that the Children are gonna turn out to be pretty dark, but it would be pretty lame if it all happened off-screen like this.

      The article also ignores the pretty obvious counterpoints, namely (1) weirwood sap has ALWAYS been described as looking like blood, even when it’s coming right out of the tree and (2) as anyone who’s cut the inside of their mouth knows, blood doesn’t taste bitter – it tastes salty and metallic, and absolutely nothing like the acorn-style bitterness described in the scene…

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    42. I have always found it weird that Jojen and Meera Reed, mere teens, were let to travel to Winterfell all on their own in the first place. That’s really odd. Why would Howland Reed let his kids wander off on their own to help Bran?

      Something is missing in the story, isn’t there?

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    43. ash,

      I think the pact of the first men is the key. The Thenns consider themselves the last First Men, and in the series they are clearly cannibals…Bloodraven is a Targaryen too, so perhaps the “Bran dragon” theory of. CoTD/Human pact with Targaryens against the Others, and being able to fly/fry some wights in the massive battle in the future…is not so far fetched.

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    44. In the years since this post, GRRM has (to my knowledge) twice made references to charcacters dead on the show yet still alive in the books and Jojen wasn’t in either list.

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