Another Game of Thrones prequel is in development – on Broadway!

Ned

If you’re exited for the upcoming House of the Dragon series – as well as the THREE other Game of Thrones prequels being discussed at HBO – you’re going to love today’s news!

The Hollywood Reporter has revealed that a Broadway play centered around the Tourney at Harrenhal is in the works! It is being produced in partnership with Kilburn Live by Simon Painter and Tim Lawson, with George RR Martin and playwright Duncan MacMillan writing the story, and Dominic Cooke directing. Expect shows in New York City, London’s West End, and in Australia beginning in 2023.

The official description reads, “The play will for the first time take audiences deeper behind the scenes of a landmark event that previously was shrouded in mystery. Featuring many of the most iconic and well-known characters from the series, the production will boast a story centered around love, vengeance, madness and the dangers of dealing in prophecy, in the process revealing secrets and lies that have only been hinted at until now.”

A statement by Martin adds, “The seeds of war are often planted in times of peace. Few in Westeros knew the carnage to come when highborn and smallfolk alike gathered at Harrenhal to watch the finest knights of the realm compete in a great tourney, during the Year of the False Spring. It is a tourney oft referred during HBO’s Game of Thrones, and in my novels, A Song of Ice & Fire…and now, at last, we can tell the whole story… on the stage.”

The Tourney at Harrenhal was an important moment in Westeros history – taking place roughly 16 years prior to the events of Game of Thrones – and setting the stage for Robert’s Rebellion and the downfall of the Targaryen dynasty. The scant information we’ve received about it so far has spawned speculation and numerous theories about what really happened there, and how it affected later events such as Lyanna Stark’s “abduction” by Prince Rhaegar Targaryen. It seems we will finally get some answers, and I, for one, couldn’t be more thrilled!

Check out the entire article here and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

101 responses

Jump to (and Always Support) the Bottom

    1. According to the Guardian article:
      The as-yet-untitled show will launch in the UK, the US and Australia in 2022. “It ought to be spectacular,” Martin said.

      According to the Hollywood Reporter: ”Expect shows in New York City, London’s West End, and in Australia beginning in 2023.”

      Are we looking at 2022 or 2023 before we see the show?

      And (wishful fancasting) Maisie Williams return to the London stage as Arya’s lookalike Aunt Lyanna?

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    2. I really wish they had shown this event on the show, could’ve been a whole episode–the Tourney at Harranhaal was so epic. Actually wouldn’t have minded an entire season that covered the events of Robert’s rebellion or a spinoff mini series rather than a play. That said, I’d rather see it in a play then not see it at all.

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    3. LatrineDiggerBrian,

      • Hey LDB! How ya been?
      • I agree that a play is better than nothing. But do we know if they might try to turn it into a musical, like Monty Python & The Holy Grail was adapted into the Broadway musical “Spamalot”?

      I can’t wait for the world to return to normal. I have fond memories of going to New York to see “Spamalot” with my family. We went because Frazier’s brother Niles (David Hyde Pierce) was starring in it.

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    4. Whenever it comes out, I’ll be definitely looking up reviews for details before probably seeing it for myself in ~2030 when it finally reaches YYC 🙂 Preferably during our own false spring (don’t put away your winter stuff yet, second winter is right around the corner.)

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    5. Mr. Buzzkill time:
      • As I was reading the parts of the article excerpted below*, I got to thinking that Big G is teasing big reveals that fans were expecting to read in the forthcoming book(s) – not see play out on stage. Am I wrong?
      • As a matter of logistics, how would a Tourney at Harrenhal be mounted on stage? I thought there’s lots of horses and jousting with lances.

      (Don’t tell me they’ll clap coconut shells 🥥🥥 together instead of ride actual horses.

      *“… story centered around love, vengeance, madness and the dangers of dealing in prophecy, in the process revealing secrets and lies that have only been hinted at until now.”

      A statement by Martin adds, “The seeds of war are often planted in times of peace. Few in Westeros knew the carnage to come when highborn and smallfolk alike gathered at Harrenhal to watch the finest knights of the realm compete in a great tourney, during the Year of the False Spring. It is a tourney oft referred during HBO’s Game of Thrones, and in my novels, A Song of Ice & Fire…and now, at last, we can tell the whole story… on the stage.”

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    6. Ten Bears: • As I was reading the parts of the article excerpted below*, I got to thinking that Big G is teasing big reveals that fans were expecting to read in the forthcoming book(s) – not see play out on stage. Am I wrong?

      There are a ton of mysteries in ASOIAF and doing this play may reveal a few but not nearly them all.

      And, in the books, the books would likely provide more detail than a 3-hour play could.

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    7. Ten Bears: As a matter of logistics, how would a Tourney at Harrenhal be mounted on stage? I thought there’s lots of horses and jousting with lances.

      I was wondering about that too XD; I’ve heard of stage productions of Ben-Hur though, also mentioned in this article of how horses are put on stage!

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    8. This is weird. But if they put good thought into the staging and sets, it could be impressive. Hopefully it’s not a half-assed money grab. Obviously it’s a story most of us want to see played out.

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    9. Adrianacandle: And, in the books, the books would likely provide more detail than a 3-hour play could.

      Ah, typo! I meant 2 hours. According to this:

      Broadway shows typically start at 7 or 8 p.m. and run 90 minutes to two hours long if there’s an intermission.

      (By “more detail”, I meant a text may provide detail that may have trouble coming across on stage — ie. inner thoughts of the POV telling it.)

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    10. Gimme a GoT musical. Same cast as the series. I’m dead serious. (But have George dictate the whole thing. He’s not gonna finish the actual books as planned anyway…)

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    11. Next up, coming on E!, in early 2022, a new, iconic show in the making…you thought you liked “The Kardashians”…get ready to experience the newest reality tv extravaganza, “The Lannisters”!!! Follow the trials, tribulations and drama of Westeros’s richest and most decadent family ! Bear witness to all the scandals, conniving, scheming, plotting and games played by this most scandalous family! From producers George “I’ll Never Finish Those Last Two Books” RR Martin and Ryan Seacrest comes the next sexy, violent and controversial family saga, “The Lannisters”!!! (***Disclaimer*** E! Networks, it’s affiliates and sponsors do not endorse and/or support incest in any way, shape or form)

      Huh…🧐🤨

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    12. And now for something completely different…well this will be my therapy during this wretched spring…and if it’s even half as good as it looks, “Shadow And Bone” will be at the very least a distraction from everything else around. I’m not familiar with the novels, and I am probably outside it’s main target audience, but it has been awhile since a trailer did elicit actual interest on my part, other than the usual “meh” shrug… (The one thing I know is that the author actually finished the books in the series…all seven of them… a trilogy and two duologies…🧐😝)

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    13. Adrianacandle: I was wondering about that too XD; I’ve heard of stage productions of Ben-Hur though, also mentioned in this article of how horses are put on stage!

      I remembered War Horse that Kit Harrington acted in before GOT.

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    14. syd:
      Gimme a GoT musical. Same cast as the series. I’m dead serious. (But have George dictate the whole thing. He’s not gonna finish the actual books as planned anyway…)

      You know, this is not such a terrible idea. Not at all!
      • Broadway musical productions are amazing. Even the Tony Awards show, and its musical numbers, are a testament to the creativity of writers, composers, costume and set designers, musicians, and performers.

      • Just as an example, take a look at the 2013 Tony Awards ceremony hosted by Neil Patrick Harris
      [2:20:13 long]

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWGGKLi-F1k

      I enjoyed:
      0:00 Opening number
      34:33 Cinderella “transformation”

      • And if George wants to dictate the story of a GoT musical, here’s a perfect candidate for a composer and lyricist of the musical numbers:

      at 52:40 – 56:05: Tony Award award winner for Best Musical Score.

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    15. Ten Bears: Broadway musical productions are amazing. Even the Tony Awards show, and its musical numbers, are a testament to the creativity of writers, composers, costume and set designers, musicians, and performers.

      OT:

      I’ve only seen a few on-stage productions and only with Broadway touring companies. However, yes to this — they are always such an incredible experience. I ended up seeing Wicked three times (2010 in Toronto, 2011 and 2014 in Calgary) because the live experience was so well done. The sparkle, the lights, the live signing, the orchestra *___*

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    16. Adrianacandle,

      (From the main post, above):

      ”…a Broadway play centered around the Tourney at Harrenhal is in the works! It is being produced in partnership with Kilburn Live by Simon Painter and Tim Lawson, with George RR Martin and playwright Duncan MacMillan writing the story….”

      I never heard of Duncan MacMillan or any of his plays, but he appears to be an up and coming, young playwright:

      Wikipedia: Duncan MacMillan, playwright [~ 41 years old]

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duncan_Macmillan_(playwright)

      Wikipedia also says “Macmillan co-created and wrote the 2020 BBC television drama series Trigonometry with Effie Wood.” Has anybody across the pond seen “Trigonometry”

      He also wrote a play called “Every Brilliant Thing” that, [“d]uring its run at the Barrow Street Theatre in New York, …was filmed for broadcast on HBO (first aired 2016).” I never saw this on HBO.

      [to be cont in a few minutes…]

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    17. Adrianacandle:
      Mr Derp,

      Yeah, most Broadway shows are usually musicals. However, there some that aren’t though, included JKR’s Cursed Child. I’m thinking (and hoping) this would be in the non-musical variety hopefully.

      (Cont. from 8:27 pm)

      It’d be a real challenge to write and produce a non-musical Broadway play. I’m not sure there’s a big enough market out there for a serious (non-comedy) stage drama based on GoT…

      Except… The R+ L love story – all of of its missing pieces from the books – could make a beautiful stage play in the right hands and with the right actors.

      It could also form the basis for a successful musical with the right composer. I can see it pitched as “Man of Lamancha” meets “West Side Story” – which itself was an adaptation of Romeo & Juliet, set to music.

      (Knights “hacking and hammering” and tourney contestants jousting… not so much.)

      I think I want to learn more about this Duncan MacMillan…

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    18. Ten Bears,

      Personally, while I’m a big big fan of musicals, I don’t really think the ASOIAF-verse would fit one in earnest. This is already being adapted for stage from a piece of unwritten book (we’ll probably never get to see) in a pretty subversive series and I think making it a musical may be a bit of a step too far.

      It’d be a real challenge to write and produce a non-musical Broadway play. I’m not sure there’s a big enough market out there for a serious (non-comedy) stage drama based on GoT…

      I think making this a non-musical Broadway play may be easier and more natural than making it a musical, especially since its details were meant to be revealed in one of the unpublished books. Plus, there are a number of non-musical stage productions — some of the most successful plays are listed in the link 🙂 I think the Tourney of Harrenhal may make for a compelling story in its own right. It’d probably draw in a “starter” audience from the ASOIAF audience (the promise of at least three long-awaited mysteries being uncovered would definitely be an attraction) but if it’s done in the right way, can stand on its own and could be recommended as a good play to see in its own right. This part of ASOIAF-lore not only deals with Lyanna, Rhaegar, and the mystery of the Knight of the Laughing Tree, the opening festivities also include Jaime joining the Kingsguard and features part of Ashara’s story (also shrouded in mystery).

      So I’d say it’d have a healthy “starter” audience (which isn’t

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    19. Ten Bears,

      Please please ignore the last line of my post! I was rearranging thoughts and a fragment of a thought (included in my second paragraph) got stuck at the bottom without my noticing — not until just after the 5-minute edit window closed 🙁

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    20. Ten Bears,

      Thanks! Sorry for not catching that wandering sentence in time!

      As for a debate… in all honesty (and I’m sorry to be a downer), I myself wouldn’t really have much more to add, especially without having seen the play or knowing of the missing pieces (obviously!) I just feel a musical wouldn’t really be the best choice for this story and personally, I really hope it’s not. I doubt making it so would stave off any ASOIAF-ers determined to see it in order to get more information from GRRM’s story though so it’s safe there. Still, with my current knowledge of the story, I think, in addition to adapting this to stage (and especially without us getting to see it in the source material as originally intended — or at least, not for a long while yet), making it a musical would feel too “off” for me. I’m sorry :/ I’m afraid I don’t have anymore to add other that this 🙁

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    21. Ten Bears: He also wrote a play called “Every Brilliant Thing” that, [“d]uring its run at the Barrow Street Theatre in New York, …was filmed for broadcast on HBO (first aired 2016).” I never saw this on HBO.

      I never have either. I remember hearing a mention of it once or twice but

      I believe it deals with themes of suicide and seems to be a focus of the story so I’ve avoided it because that can be a trigger for me.

      However, the writer does sound intriguing 🙂

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    22. Ten Bears,

      That said, I could be wrong (about it not fitting a musical) — I mean, I don’t have any special information that nobody else has access to and I’m probably missing a lot of information 🙂 This is just my current position on musical vs. non-musical in this particular case.

      We’ve got a pretty unique situation where the author of these highly anticipated, perpetually unfinished books is presenting a part of his own story via stage rather than in the books. And ironically, in books that he seems to forever procrastinate on with this play being the latest instance of that.

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    23. Adrianacandle,

      There have been some musicals which have worked which have been based on serious work. Offhand I can think of “South Pacific” based on source material by James A Michener, “Les Miserables” (based on a Victor Hugo novel), “Oliver” from a book by Charles Dickens and “Carousel” which was derived from a play by Ferenc Molnar. Musicals aren’t all light and fluffy. Ultimately, it would depend on the skill of the composer(s)/dramatist(s) I guess.

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    24. Adrianacandle,

      I looked at the article you linked – ah yes, “War Horse” in which a then upcoming British actor featured in one British stage version – Kit Harington, I wonder what happened to him. I don’t work in the theatre but I’ve heard that maybe “Coriolanus” (Shakespeare) isn’t staged that often because there are a lot of battle scenes. I did a little study of French literature back in the day (forgotten most of it now) but I remember being taught that in the plays by, say, Racine the big battles had to take place off stage by law (seemingly too many young French noblemen i.e. their potential officer class should there be a war were being killed in duels so nothing apparently glorifying fighting was allowed on stage ). So could the knights at Harrenhal take part in the tourney offstage relying on the spoken word of the onstage actors to convey what had happened?

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    25. Dame of Mercia: There have been some musicals which have worked which have been based on serious work. Offhand I can think of “South Pacific” based on source material by James A Michener, “Les Miserables” (based on a Victor Hugo novel), “Oliver” from a book by Charles Dickens and “Carousel” which was derived from a play by Ferenc Molnar. Musicals aren’t all light and fluffy. Ultimately, it would depend on the skill of the composer(s)/dramatist(s) I guess.

      Oh yes, there are serious musicals. However, in the examples you cite, the source material has already been available. Here, though, this is the first time the author himself is presenting the material to an audience and I doubt it was written to be a musical. My concern would be how much would be altered to make it a musical and how far away from the original spirit it would be.

      I think there are a number of factors to consider when altering a story to become a musical and, essentially, I think making this decision would need to be a story-driven one rather than simply an enhancement. For some stories, it absolutely serves and even has its own plot purpose sometimes. For others, not so much.

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    26. Dame of Mercia,

      Right, it’s a tourney as opposed to a full-scale battle — which I think would make it more of a competition than a war but I get your point 🙂 It seems to be one of the more significant challenges for stage, though. However, it is possible — Ben-Hur was adapted to the stage, including the chariot race:

      The production team travelled across Europe to select the animals needed for the show. The horses for the chariot race, which are to be trained over the next 12 months, are from Andalucia in Spain, while a bird sanctuary in western France provided three birds of prey. “The chariot race will be real and high speed, audience members sitting in the first row will feel the sand on them,” added Mr Abraham.

      The show, he added, would stick closely to the novel, which earned the distinction of being the first piece of fiction to be blessed by the Pope soon after its publication.

      As for battle, it can be difficult according to this article.
      (As for KH, I believe he is involved in a Marvel movie that has been delayed due to COVID — Eternals).

      However, thankfully, this is a tourney as opposed to a full-out on-stage battle. I think it’d be jousting? I think there would be ways to show it on-stage without relying on the spoken word detailing what happened. I think that runs the risk of taking away from the story, especially one covering a tourney. I think I remember seeing an article detailing how it’s done on-stage that I’ll include in a comment after this 🙂

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    27. Dame of Mercia,

      This article covers how jousting was done for stage and for dinner theatre:

      While Montaner briefly flirted with the idea of having Heston appear at the opening of his Florida location (ultimately, the actor proved too expensive to hire), Medieval Times wasn’t dependent on marquee names. The appeal came from the idea of seeing what amounted to a live stunt show, with armored knights hoisting broad swords and ramming into one another in jousts. Their stage would be a massive sand floor; attendees could enjoy Cornish hen and cheer for one of six knights depending on which section they were seated in. In keeping with their (loose) interpretation of medieval practices, no utensils would be allowed.

      Whatever stigma had been attached to dinner theater for veteran actors didn’t apply to patrons. The Kissimmee location of Medieval Times saw its attendance rise steadily, from 183,000 in 1984 to 600,000 by 1993. The investment firm opened a second location in Buena Park, California in 1986, and a third in Lyndhurst, New Jersey in 1990. The last castle in their expansion opened in Atlanta in 2006.

      Initially, fight choreographers at each location were left to develop their own house style, with knights dueling using titanium swords that had been dulled and edged to create a spark. In 2000, management decreed that the moves become uniform in the event knights had to substitute for one another due to illness or, more rarely, injury. (Knighthood is largely safe, though the occasional bruised finger is not unheard of.)

      The duelists appearing in the show normally start out as stable hands for the horses. (Medieval Times uses so many Andalusian, or Spanish, horses that they have their own breeding farm in Sanger, Texas.) After three to 12 months of training, they’re expected to take a physical fitness test—running one mile in under 10 minutes, performing 30 push-ups and 50 sit-ups—before taking hold of the 20 pounds of weaponry.

      According to the article, jousts in dinner theatre had an appeal that “came from the idea of seeing what amounted to a live stunt show, with armored knights hoisting broad swords and ramming into one another in jousts,” and this was done in the 60s. I think they can adapt some of the same techniques for today with the inclusion of the tourney in this story?

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    28. I suppose where there’s a will there’s a way…horses were used in Peter Brook’s late 1980s English language (very much shortened) adaptation of ‘The Mahabharata’ though that was on film. I believe the first version (of PB’s adaptation) was a live play in a disused quarry somewhere in France.

      Thinking of horses, although I mentioned this some time ago, here is an interview where Rachel Weisz mentions something that happened when playing a part which necessitated her riding a horse which had previously been in GoT (though the interviewer annoys me – not his fault, he just annoys me), https://youtu.be/tFcEByVkgJ4

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    29. Dame of Mercia:
      I suppose where there’s a will there’s a way…horses were used in Peter Brook’s late 1980s English language (very much shortened) adaptation of ‘The Mahabharata’ though that was on film. I believe the first version (of PB’s adaptation) was a live play in a disused quarry somewhere in France.

      Thinking of horses, although I mentioned this some time ago, here is an interview where Rachel Weisz mentions something that happened when playing a part which necessitated her riding a horse which had previously been in GoT (though the interviewer annoys me – not his fault, he just annoys me), https://youtu.be/tFcEByVkgJ4

      True!

      Btw, as an aside and OT for those interested (concerning the traffic jam you could see from space — the ship that was stuck in the Suez Canal):

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    30. Adrianacandle,

      ”…We’ve got a pretty unique situation where the author of these highly anticipated, perpetually unfinished books is presenting a part of his own story via stage rather than in the books. And ironically, in books that he seems to forever procrastinate on with this play being the latest instance…”

      Your comment got me thinking – and bear with me for a moment while I engage in some positive speculation about this “unique situation”….

      – Let’s assume that Duncan Macmillan is in fact a talented, creative, up and coming young playwright, as his wikipedia biography seems to suggest;

      – That would mean that the creatively blocked or creatively drained GRRM will be collaborating with a co-writer who’s brimming with energy, ideas and enthusiasm to tell the Harrenhal story;

      – Many fans have been complaining that GRRM should get another author involved to finish or help him finish ASOIAF;

      – Scripts for stage plays can be literature in their own right. See, e.g., W. Shakespeare. Well-written dialogue on the printed page can translate well onto the stage or screen.

      I would imagine we could all cite lots of iconic passages from novels and plays that were made into memorable TV or movie performances. One example (in my view) was a speech by Josey Wales in the book “Gone to Texas,” that was turned into a riveting scene by Clint Eastwood in the movie “The Outlaw Josey Wales.”

      – So, maybe pairing up the fading, aging author with a young but accomplished playwright might enable GRRM to “write” his story in the form of a
      play or plays.

      Students still read Romeo & Juliet as literature, even though they can watch Clair Danes brilli**tly deliver Juliet’s lines on screen.

      – Presenting the story of Harrenhal as a stage play might be a blessing in disguise for exasperated book readers, and maybe for GRRM himself if he is able to work well with his co-writer. Even if it’s in the form of a play rather than a book, long-suffering fans can finally read more ASOIAF material from the mind of the creator.

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    31. Ten Bears,

      So, maybe pairing up the fading, aging author with a young but accomplished playwright might enable GRRM to “write” his story in the form of a play or plays.

      This thought crossed my mind too! 🙂 I’d definitely prefer books by far because they offer those POV perspectives, among other reasons, but I’ll take what I can get!

      The downside I see to this would be that it’d probably take many, many plays (two books may not even be enough for everything he’s set up) and plays take some time to put together. Meanwhile, Harrenhal is just one event.

      Presenting the story of Harrenhal as a stage play might be a blessing in disguise for exasperated book readers, and maybe for GRRM himself if he is able to work well with his co-writer. Even if it’s in the form of a play rather than a book, long-suffering fans can finally read more ASOIAF material from the mind of the creator.

      While I’m unsure if plays are a suitable format for the conclusion of GRRM’s books (there’s just… so so so so…. much to cover, so many storylines), I think this is kind of a blessing in disguise: it’ll give fresh material for ASOIAF theory factories, new material to pick apart to the nth degree, and I’m kind of hoping it’ll help clear GRRM of whatever blockage he’s experiencing by sparking those creative juices again.

      That may be a fool’s hope however…

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    32. Dame of Mercia:
      Adrianacandle,

      There have been some musicals which have worked which have been based on serious work. Offhand I can think of “South Pacific” based on source material by James A Michener, “Les Miserables” (based on a Victor Hugo novel), “Oliver” from a book by Charles Dickens and “Carousel” which was derived from a play by Ferenc Molnar. Musicals aren’t all light and fluffy. Ultimately, it would depend on the skill of the composer(s)/dramatist(s) I guess.

      Great examples! And some really good songs came out of the printed page-to-stage process.

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    33. Adrianacandle,

      ”This thought crossed my mind too! 🙂 I’d definitely prefer books by fair because they offer those POV perspectives, among other reasons, but I’ll take what I can get!

      Of course there are limitations. However, maybe a little structure would help G rein in his sprawling story (“prune” his garden).

      Also, Broadway shows have lots of effective techniques for portraying POV perspectives and internal monologues.

      I’m flashing on F. Murray Abraham as Salieri in the film version of the musical “Amadeus” – and how certain scenes were introduced or narrated by the voice of decrepit old “future” Salieri explaining what his “present day” counterpart was really thinking. Sh*t. I’d better stop. I loved that movie/musical.

      Six Degrees of Game of Thrones: Roy Dotrice (Pyromancer Hallyne; ASOIAF audiobooks narrator) as Mozart’s father.

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    34. Ten Bears: Of course there are limitations. However, maybe a little structure would help G rein in his sprawling story (“prune” his garden).

      I don’t know… there’s so much that needs to happen, so many separate storylines, so many characters, so many things that need to be explored, etc. that even with pruning, two books alone — let alone a series of plays — may not even be enough. Many things would need to be cut and outright doing so would likely harm the story rather than help because I imagine they’re part of the set-ups he has in place for what he wants to do. How to make those things happen is another thing though.

      I think the essential issue for GRRM isn’t the medium but tying everything together into a coherent narrative and bringing it all home. For me, just as a reader, the prospect is pretty dizzying. In contrast, GRRM seems to have the history of his world and the pre-ASOIAF events figured out, including the true story of Harrenhal. In addition to it being one event, it’d be pretty doable for a play.

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    35. Adrianacandle,

      ”I don’t know… there’s so much that needs to happen, so many separate storylines, so many characters, so many things that need to be explored, etc. that even with pruning, two books alone — let alone a series of plays — may not even be enough. Many things would need to be cut and outright doing so would likely harm the story rather than help because I imagine they’re part of the set-ups he has in place for what he wants to do.”

      I do not disagree. However, at this juncture (early 2021 with no indication TWOW will ever see the light of day), would it be better to have a cut and pruned story rather than none at all? (I can’t answer that.)

      ”I think the essential issue for GRRM isn’t the medium but tying everything together into a coherent narrative and bringing it all home.”

      So, if he’s been unable – for ten years – to tie everything together into a coherent narrative and bring it all home, is it better to hold out hope he’ll somehow get a burst of inspiration and crank out TWOW and ADOS… or settle for stripped down version in another medium? (I don’t know the answer to that either.) 🤥

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    36. Ten Bears,

      As a book reader, I would want the full experience from GRRM — all that GRRM intended — because that’s what I’m here for. Even if the books never get finished (something I’m resigned to, a prospect quite a few book readers are resigned to it seems), I’d take that over a stripped down version from GRRM or it’s not really ASOIAF. Anything less wouldn’t really offer answers or conclusions to all those stories people have been speculating for 25+ years. At least an unfinished book series keeps all theories and spec alive in some way 😉 The magic is in those details and all of the mysteries and stories he’s set up. True, he goes overboard sometimes and needs help with that but it’s all of these stories coming together that makes this particular book story, I think.

      And I think a stripped down version would be even more difficult and create even more work, lending itself to be an even more intimidating process. Brevity is all that much more difficult and if there’s anything GRRM isn’t, it’s brief 😉

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    37. Adrianacandle,

      “The magic is in those details and all of the mysteries and stories he’s set up…”

      Yes, you’re right. “The magic is in [the] details.”
      I was thinking about the movie “Juno” the other day. A sterile, stripped down recital of the story would not be interesting at all.

      ”High School girl gets pregnant; decides to have the baby and give it up for adoption,” though accurate, wouldn’t quite capture the charm of the movie.

        Quote  Reply

    38. Ten Bears,

      That is a great movie. I’ve been meaning to ask you for a while, what did you think of its soundtrack? I listened to it so much when I was in university and grad school, I think I’ve got each song memorized.

        Quote  Reply

    39. ⚠️ 🚂 Warning! Temporary Thread Derailment
      Arya on the King’s Road circa 1970

      from Digital Spy article, 3/31/2021:

      Headline: “Game of Thrones’ Maisie Williams looks unrecognisable in blonde transformation for Sex Pistols drama”

      Maisie is playing model Pamela Rooke in a new series.

      https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/maisie-williams-filming-sex-pistols-show-1617189948.jpg?resize=480:*

      Game of Thrones star Maisie Williams has undergone a big transformation for her latest role.
      The actress is playing model Pamela Rooke in a new TV drama about punk band The Sex Pistols.
      In a behind-the-scenes picture from the set, Maisie can be seen rocking Rooke’s signature look – a huge blonde bouffant hair with matching bleached eyebrows.

        Quote  Reply

    40. Adrianacandle,

      Oh! I liked that scene

      when a pissed off Juno told Jason Bateman’s character what she really thought about the “Superstar” remake – that it sucked. (Wasn’t it a Sonic Youth cover of the classic Carpenters’ song?)

      I didn’t recall

      that “All the Young Dudes” was in “Juno” – in addition to “Clueless.”
      That song’s got all kinds of rabbit holes leading to and out of it, e.g., David Bowie (wrote it) and T. Rex (name-dropped in lyrics).

        Quote  Reply

    41. Adrianacandle,

      … And when it comes to converting fantasy source material into a serious musical on film and on stage, there’s…

      … the 2003 Broadway musical “Wicked” based on the 1995 Gregory Maguire novel “Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West,”itself a retelling of the 1900 novel, “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum and the 1939 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical film “The Wizard of Oz.”

      https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/2RAAAOSwzhVWrs8-/s-l300.jpg

        Quote  Reply

    42. Ten Bears: … And when it comes to converting fantasy source material into a serious musical on film and on stage, there’s…

      … the 2003 Broadway musical “Wicked” based on the 1995 Gregory Maguire novel “Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West,”itself a retelling of the 1900 novel, “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum and the 1939 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical film “The Wizard of Oz.”

      Sorry, TB! I had to drop off for a bit to go to Home Depot.

      I wouldn’t call this a great example. The changes between each of those is significant. ‘Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West’ is a pretty depressing, dark tale and takes a lot of leeway with the inspiration it draws from the original tale. Meanwhile, the musical (Wicked), based on Maguire’s book, is far far happier with quite a few changes — basically, the only thing it shares in common with its source material is the names of the main characters, how they are related to each other, that the two protagonists meet and develop together at witch school where they have their friendship before going on their separate ways. Everything else is really different. “Disneyfied” would be a good word for the change between the Wicked book and the Wicked musical 🙂

      I love the musical, it’s a great production in its own right, but it bears little similarity to its source material.

        Quote  Reply

    43. Ten Bears,

      Here’s a more in-depth look at the changes between Wicked’s book and its musical counterpart. The musical is light-hearted and funny while still moving, and has a kind of different focus. And it’s a production I’d recommend to anyone because it truly is (IMO) a great way to spend an afternoon/night and is entertaining, well-written, and engaging from the first number 🙂 The book is also very well-written but it presents quite a different story and tone.

      I’d recommend both but I found the book pretty hard to take in some areas. It can be pretty rough.

        Quote  Reply

    44. Adrianacandle,

      Alright. I’ll concede that Sonic Youth’s cover of “Superstar” doesn’t qualify for a Crappy Remake Rant like, say, Blue Swede’s mutilation of B.J. Thomas’s classic “Hooked on a Feeling.”
      Still, it’s hard to avoid unfavorable comparisons when remaking a song performed by Karen Carpenter.

        Quote  Reply

    45. Ten Bears: Alright. I’ll concede that Sonic Youth’s cover of “Superstar” doesn’t qualify for a Crappy Remake Rant like, say, Blue Swede’s mutilation of B.J. Thomas’s classic “Hooked on a Feeling.”
      Still, it’s hard to avoid unfavorable comparisons when remaking a song performed by Karen Carpenter.

      I confess that my opinion is coloured by the fact that I was exposed to Sonic Youth’s cover first and I have strong, strong memories associated with that version 🙂

        Quote  Reply

    46. Adrianacandle: I confess that my opinion is coloured by the fact that I was exposed to Sonic Youth’s cover first and I have strong, strong memories associated with that version 🙂

      Ah, I understand the strong memory association.
      A song can do that, depending on what you were doing or with whom when you heard it.

      It’s like Marcel Proust wrote about in “Remembrance of Things Past” (also translated as “In Search of Lost Time”), when the taste of a madeleine (cookie or pastry?) evokes forgotten memories from his past.
      Full Disclosure: I never read Proust. Although the book series was assigned reading in school, I never opened any of the books. 🙄 Whatever I know about them came from the blurb on the back cover of the first volume.

      Unfortunately, for me

      the only memory associated with Sonic Youth’s cover of “Superstar” is Juno pretending to like it when Mark first played it for her, before later telling him that it sucks. I hope your “strong, strong memories” associated with it are more pleasant.

        Quote  Reply

    47. Ten Bears,

      Yes. That reminds me a bit of how smells are so strongly associated to memory. I think I read somewhere that of all the senses, they are believed to have the strongest connection to memory.

      (Good question about madeleines btw)

      the only memory associated with Sonic Youth’s cover of “Superstar” is Juno pretending to like it when Mark first played it for her, before later telling him that it sucks. I hope your “strong, strong memories” associated with it are more pleasant.

      I remember that scene well but I think because I listened to the song more apart from that scene while walking to and fro or while I was on the bus/train, the song itself became associated with those years (university and grad school) for me rather than the scene itself. Yes, they are very nice memories because grad school was the best part of my life 🙂

        Quote  Reply

    48. Ten Bears,

      When I was thinking of serious themes which were adapted to musicals how can I have forgotten “West Side Story” from “Romeo and Juliet”? I’ve never seen “Sweeney Todd” but the subject matter there is dark. “Oklahoma!” and “State Fair” couldn’t really be called dark but they do have some sombre themes mixed in with the lighter fare – which is representative of life I guess, a mixture.

        Quote  Reply

    49. I missed you all a lot and I missed GOT as well, but I couldn’t decide to write again on WotW after my disappointment on the last GOT season. Although I used to come here regularly to read any news and comments I could find! I still love GOT and any film or series connected to Westeros is great news for me. Unfortunately I won’t be able to see the play as I’m a (not at all rich) European and traveling has become so much harder nowadays because.. you know!
      One of the things I miss the most is going to the theater, in my city there are 3 I used to go to regularly. Last year one of my greatest joy was that I could watch online Midsummer Night’s Dream with the wonderful Gwendoline Christie as Titania and Hypolita. And I was further impressed that she took the time to reply to everybody who wrote to her on instagram – more than 200 people!

        Quote  Reply

    50. Shy Lady Dragon: One of the things I miss the most is going to the theater, in my city there are 3 I used to go to regularly. Last year one of my greatest joy was that I could watch online Midsummer Night’s Dream with the wonderful Gwendoline Christie as Titania and Hypolita. And I was further impressed that she took the time to reply to everybody who wrote to her on instagram – more than 200 people!

      That is really, really lovely! 🙂

      I miss the theatre experience too 🙁 Talking about Wicked as much as I have, I believe that production was supposed to come to Calgary again this past year but had to be cancelled due to covid. It would have been my 4th time *____*

        Quote  Reply

    51. Glad to see Shy Lady Dragon back. However on 4th April I’m just here to wish runners of the site and visitors to the site, new, returning and never really been away a happy Paschal Feast, Easter, Passover – whatever you like to call it (and I know not everyone who visits this site is of a religious persuasion). It’s quite pleasant in my part of the UK at present though there has been mention of the weather turning colder from tomorrow onwards.

        Quote  Reply

    52. Adrianacandle: I was wondering about that too XD; I’ve heard of stage productions of Ben-Hur though, also mentioned in this article of how horses are put on stage!

      Thanks for that article about ways to put (running) horses in a staged play.

      I think the treadmill technique was the best, though I wonder if modern safety regulations, costly insurance, and animal cruelty prohibitions might make that impractical these days.
      I saw a clip from a 2013 Broadway musical using the treadmill technique to show characters “running” from the audience’s perspective while actually staying in one place on stage. It was quite effective.
      I’ve got to admit that the artisans and experts behind the scenery, lighting and “mechanics” of Broadway shows can produce all kinds of optical illusions and make you believe you’re watching almost anything.

        Quote  Reply

    53. Shy Lady Dragon:
      Adrianacandle,

      May we all be able to go to theater soon! Or wherever we might like!

      Good to see you back, and I too hope we can all go to the theater, or wherever we’d like, in the near future.

      Along those lines… Con of Thrones is now four months away. It’s scheduled for August 6-8, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. I wonder if it will be safe to travel and congregate by then, or if

      the selfish anti-mask, anti-vax morons and politicians in Florida will ruin it for everyone.

        Quote  Reply

    54. Ten Bears,

      Oh, you’re right, those are practical concerns, particularly in regard to the horses. I’d think it’d depend on the method devised, the horse’s training, the trainer, rider, and the horse to determine if it’s safe for the horse and rider. If it’s been done as recently as 2013, well after there’s been a spotlight on animal cruelty, I think it’s more likely that it is safe for the horse but that’s only mere speculation. My knowledge of horses ends with with beginner’s basics and even there, I sucked (horses lead me, not I them! 😭)

      But as an aside, tourney re-enactments have been done for dinner theatres so I think it is possible! But again, well outside of my realm of expertise 🙂

      I’ve got to admit that the artisans and experts behind the scenery, lighting and “mechanics” of Broadway shows can produce all kinds of optical illusions and make you believe you’re watching almost anything.

      Absolutely! So so many breathtaking scenes have been done on stage using lighting and practical/digital effects! It’s really really incredible.

        Quote  Reply

    55. Ten Bears:

      the selfish anti-mask, anti-vax morons and politicians in Florida will ruin it for everyone.
      These were my thoughts exactly when, in response to the Alberta govt’s decision to not relax COVID measures due to rising hospitalizations and variant cases, people in the comments were complaining that health officials were lying, this is all some big “conspiracy”, covid isn’t that serious, and they’re not going to listen and will keep doing what they want anyway.

      Health officials have identified social gatherings in homes (in defiance of the measures) as the main cause COVID still has a fighting chance. These idiots in the comments, complaining, are among the perpetrators — by their own admission that they’re still having social events in home (“I didn’t get sick! It’s fake!”) They’re a big reason why we still have to keep enforcing measures and adding new ones. I don’t think they understand that viruses aren’t stagnant — they’re alive with the ability to evolve and overcome existing defenses when given a chance (incubation), which is exactly what social gatherings enable.

      The anger that blossoms in my chest because of this….

      COVID rant over 🙂

        Quote  Reply

    56. Adrianacandle,

      If it’s been done as recently as 2013, well after there’s been a spotlight on animal cruelty, I think it’s more likely that it is safe for the horse but that’s only mere speculation.

      Sorry if I wasn’t clear. The 2013 production* I was referring to used treadmills for (human) actors, not horses – though I’m sure there were safety concerns for actors dancing and running (while singing!) on movable treadmills as well.

      Lemme see if I can find that treadmill scene. The scene, at the 2013 Tony Awards show, was a recreation of a musical number from the musical “Kinky Boots.” Full Disclosure:

      I only found the video of the Tony Awards show because I was looking for a clip of Cyndi Lauper winning the Tony Award for Best Original Score for a Musical for “Kinky Boots.”

      . I wound up watching most of the 2+ hour long show.

      It reminded me of the “magic” of live performances, and how much this Year of Solitude has made me miss communal entertainment experiences like movies, concerts, and stage plays and shows. (Who would’ve thought the neon lights would ever go out on Broadway? 😢)

        Quote  Reply

    57. Adrianacandle:
      Ten Bears,

      …Absolutely! So so many breathtaking scenes have been done on stage using lighting and practical/digital effects! It’s really really incredible.

      2013 Tony Awards – full show hosted by Neil Patrick Harris [2:20:13 long video]

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWGGKLi-F1k

      At 2:04:30 – 207:15:50 Treadmills used in “Kinky Boots” 👢musical number

      Some other highlights:
      • 0:00 – 8:00: Opening song and dance musical number with Neil Patrick Harris

      (including…. Mike Tyson??? at 3:15 – 3:36)

      • 33:00 – 37:01 Cinderella **
      especially… ** “Lighting and practical effects” in Cinderella’s transformation from rags to beautiful ball gown 👗+ horses & carriage at 34:32 **
      (I can see how it’s done. It still looks wonderful.)

      • 52:40 – 56:05 Tony Award for writer and composer of Best Musical Score written for the theater

      • 1:11:35 The Rascals with Felix Cavaliere singing “Good Lovin” (1966 hit song) from “The Rascals: Once Upon a Dream.”

      I didn’t know there was a Broadway musical based on the Rascals – or that they performed this 1966 song live 50 years later.

      • 1:54:25 – 1:58:58 Leading Actress in a Play (Cicely Tyson in “The Trip to Bountiful” at age 88).

        Quote  Reply

    58. Ten Bears,

      Thanks!
      I’m glad you have bought tickets, it’s good to be optimistic! There’s still 4 months for things to improve, so I think it’s not unrealistic to expect you’ll have a good time at Con of Thrones.
      I remember you mentioned Rory McCann appearing in some film or TV show, but I don’t remember which. Was it Irregulars? I read that he played a part there, but I don’t know how important it is.

        Quote  Reply

    59. Shy Lady Dragon,

      I think it was Tron79 who spotted Rory McCann in an episode of “The Irregulars” as “The Bird Master.”

      Tron79’s description of Rory McCann’s initial appearance may be in the Comment Section under a previous post, along with my reply that the scene as Tron79 described it reminded me of Sandor’s surprise reappearance in the cold open to S6e7 of GoT.

      I miss The Hound…

      🐓🐓

        Quote  Reply

    60. Adrianacandle,

      Semi Off-Topic Reply to Covid Rant:

      Here’s why I think it could be safe by August to attend Con of Thrones in Orlando, Florida, but it probably won’t be… 😡

      excerpted from the Dailykos 4/3/21

      https://www.dailykos.com/story/2021/4/3/2024242/-Gov-Ron-DeSantis-is-taking-action-to-make-sure-no-one-escapes-from-Republican-mistakes

      “…The United States passed 100 million people who have received at least one dose of the vaccine. The idea that these people can travel more or less as they did before the pandemic has generated a huge sense of excitement and relief for companies and individuals who have been among those most badly hurt by the economic effects of COVID-19.

      But, as The Guardian reports, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis also took action on Friday. DeSantis issued an executive order banning private businesses from requesting proof of vaccination. “Requiring so-called Covid-19 vaccine passports for taking part in everyday life—such as attending a sporting event, patronizing a restaurant or going to a movie theater—would create two classes of citizens,” DeSantis wrote.

      Which is, of course, exactly the point. There are two classes of Florida citizens: Those who can safely take part in activities where they may be exposed to COVID-19, and those who cannot.

      In issuing this order, DeSantis isn’t just causing harm for industries that have a large presence in his state—like cruise lines, which have already begun insisting on proof of vaccination for those boarding their ships—he is deliberately endangering the lives of Florida’s citizens. Not because he doesn’t have the necessary information. Not because there’s any real issue of “freedom”—any more than there is when grade schools require children to be vaccinated against a host of diseases. DeSantis is deliberately politicizing proof of vaccination, and there’s little doubt that he’s just the first. Other Republican governors are sure to follow suit.
      Where there are Republican legislatures, they’re likely to put this into law. The reason is simple enough, and it has absolutely nothing to do with the idea of jack-booted health officials putting out a hand to demand, “show me your papers.”

      The reason is this: Republicans are the least likely people to be vaccinated. As of Friday, Civiqs still shows that 40% of Republicans state they will not get the COVID-19 vaccine, and another 10% remain unsure. While 30% of Republican adults have been vaccinated at this point, that puts them well below the rate of other Americans, and only 19% of Republicans who have not been vaccinated say that they intend to get vaccinated.

      So, as in Florida, there already are two classes of Americans—those who are listening to science and the advice of medical experts, and those who are members of a party whose base is now deeply anti-science. One of the key factors that made the pandemic so bad in the United States isn’t just a lack of good guidance from Washington, or even bad governance at the state level, but a Republican population who has often acted to spread COVID-19, even if it killed them. Some of those Republicans remain so fixed in their anti-science positions that they’re still denying the disease exists, even as they’re dying. 

      Republicans haven’t just failed to take steps to address the pandemic, they’ve deliberately made things worse. Now, with an end to the pandemic in sight, those same Republicans are still refusing to take the step that could not just save their lives, but prevent COVID-19 from becoming an endemic disease that comes back again and again. 
      All Ron DeSantis is doing is making sure there is just one class of Americans: those whose lives and jobs are threated by Republicans.

      Throngs of maskless morons congregating in bars and restaurants on South Beach during Spring Break is just a harbinger of a resurgence of 🦠 down here in Florida.

        Quote  Reply

    61. Ten Bears,

      So do I! And I know you like the character and actor a lot, that’s why I thought you were the one who gave this piece of information.

        Quote  Reply

    62. Ten Bears,

      Sorry if I wasn’t clear. The 2013 production* I was referring to used treadmills for (human) actors, not horses – though I’m sure there were safety concerns for actors dancing and running (while singing!) on movable treadmills as well.

      Oh, I see! Thanks for the clarification! You’re right, yes. Still, I think this would be more safe for a trained actor over one without the required skill… and one who had signed the relevant contracts and various documents releasing relevant parties from responsibility 😉

      Speaking of treadmills, btw, I’m watching Mad Men and saw that (opening?) scene from Bye Bye Birdie where Ann-Margret was on a treadmill in front of that blue screen, singing!

      Also, thank-you so much for that clip!

      It reminded me of the “magic” of live performances, and how much this Year of Solitude has made me miss communal entertainment experiences like movies, concerts, and stage plays and shows. (Who would’ve thought the neon lights would ever go out on Broadway? 😢)

      Right? 🙁 Which will bring me to our covid chat in my next reply…

        Quote  Reply

    63. Ten Bears,

      So, as in Florida, there already are two classes of Americans—those who are listening to science and the advice of medical experts, and those who are members of a party whose base is now deeply anti-science. One of the key factors that made the pandemic so bad in the United States isn’t just a lack of good guidance from Washington, or even bad governance at the state level, but a Republican population who has often acted to spread COVID-19, even if it killed them. Some of those Republicans remain so fixed in their anti-science positions that they’re still denying the disease exists, even as they’re dying.

      Republicans haven’t just failed to take steps to address the pandemic, they’ve deliberately made things worse. Now, with an end to the pandemic in sight, those same Republicans are still refusing to take the step that could not just save their lives, but prevent COVID-19 from becoming an endemic disease that comes back again and again.

      All Ron DeSantis is doing is making sure there is just one class of Americans: those whose lives and jobs are threated by Republicans.

      Yep, this excerpt succinctly explains the problem and a big reason why covid is still plaguing us (pun intended). People who believe they know better than science, people who aren’t looking at the long-term consequences and how much worse things can and will get the longer covid remains an issue. Yes, businesses, lives, and jobs do suffer and depression/social isolation is a major consequence as well as job loss. However, people will keep suffering more and more and depression and such consequences will worsen as covid lingers (and worse: newer, stronger variants of covid which have evolved and adapted to account for existing defenses), including death and fatalities. It’s a hard hard situation but ignoring measures, believing covid is fake, believing one knows better than science leads to a much harder, longer situation. It won’t make covid go away, no matter how fake some think it is or wish it was.

      Ugh, and yes, Florida is the mecca for Spring Breakers 🙁

        Quote  Reply

    64. Ten Bears,

      I can’t wait to watch this film! I wouldn’t guess I could find Maisie in a film about Sex Pistols, but she proves versatile as usual… great transformation!

        Quote  Reply

    65. Shy Lady Dragon,

      “Pistol” is going to be a six-part series on FX,

      based on a memoir by one of the Sex Pistols. In addition to Arya – I mean Maisie Williams – as “punk fashion icon” Jordan, Jojen – I mean Thomas Brodie-Sangster – is going to play Malcolm McClaren, the Sex Pistols manager and co-owner of the King’s Road clothes store in which Jordan worked.

      Other casting tidbits: Iris Law, Jude Law’s daughter, will play “Soo Catwoman,” whoever that was. Actor Kyle Chandler’s daughter Sydney Chandler will play Chrissie Hynde, who worked in the clothes store before skyrocketing to fame as lead singer of The Pretenders. And Tallulah Riley (from “Westworld,” and also Tom Hardy’s distracting blonde woman avatar in a cameo in the movie “Inception”) is going to play store co-owner and fashion designer Vivienne Westwood.

      I’m glad that it looks like the series is going to portray the fashion world of 1970’s London, and hopefully won’t be just another rock band biopic. (I’m not a big Sex Pistols fan anyway. On the other hand, if it were a Pretenders biopic? That I’d be 100% on board with…)

      I too “wouldn’t guess I could find Maisie in a film about Sex Pistols, but she proves versatile as usual… great transformation!”.

      Interesting career choice, to say the least. I hope she’s got a meaty part. They’ve been using her name in the headlines of articles and announcements, so I’d be disappointed if she’s only going to be in a secondary role.

        Quote  Reply

    66. Has anyone else heard about HBO’s “Iron Anniversary” campaign?

      I just saw this article on-line [excerpts follow]

      https://www.cbr.com/game-of-thrones-iron-anniversary/

      “Game of Thrones Unveils Massive 10-Year Iron Anniversary Plans”

      HBO announces the start of a month-long Iron Anniversary campaign to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Game of Thrones series premiere.

      HBO announced plans to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Game of Thrones premiere by launching its The Iron Anniversary campaign this month.

      Beginning April 5, the month-long Game of Thrones celebration is aimed to engage passionate fans of the hit series and to attract a new audience to the upcoming Game of Throne prequel series, House of the Dragons, which is scheduled to begin production this year….

      ****
      Warner Bros. Consumer Products and its licensing partners have also teamed up to create a line of special-edition products in honor of The Iron Anniversary. Here are the items being released as part of the festivities:

      • A one-of-a-kind Imperial egg by Fabergé, the world’s most iconic artist jeweler, inspired by Daenerys Targaryen, and co-designed by series Emmy Award-winning costume designer Michele Clapton. The egg includes a miniature crown designed by Ms. Clapton, which represents the crown Daenerys would have worn had she taken the Iron Throne.

      • Mikkeller, the Danish craft beer company, have launched a range of beers inspired by the series, that will let fans all over the world celebrate one stein at a time. Fans can cheer with the first beer in the assortment called “Iron Anniversary IPA.”

      • Pop culture products leader Funko have unveiled a new iron-textured limited-edition assortment of fan-favorite “Game of Thrones” Pop! vinyl collectibles and new figures based on Arya Stark, Khal Drogo, and many more. Available for pre-order now at retailers everywhere.
      ————
      I want that Faberge egg with the Michele Clapton-designed miniature crown inside!!!!!

      I suspect Funko Pop collectors are going to be curious about the new “iron-textured limited edition assortment of fan-favorite” collectibles and “new figures based on Arya Stark, Khal Drogo, and many more.”

        Quote  Reply

    67. Ten Bears,

      I would watch a film just to see a Maisie cameo, but yeah, I hope her part is meaty!
      I don’t know much about Sex Pistols history and the connections among some characters – never heard of Jordan, I’m afraid! – but this makes everything more interesting. I had a quick look about the upcoming film. but reading your descriptions about actors and their parts puts everything in the perspective and increases my excitement.
      I must add that working in that clothes shop would be some great job! I remember traveling to Germany for the first time (in 1990) and entering a punk clothes boutique out of curiosity, where the shop assistant and few customers seemed like characters in a play! I’m afraid I was staring at them but they didn’t pay any attention to poor little boring me 🙂

        Quote  Reply

    68. I was trying to edit my previous comment to get rid of that awkward repetition and I got the message that my action was marked as spam (?)
      And the comment has disappeared!

        Quote  Reply

    69. Shy Lady Dragon:
      I was trying to edit my previous comment to get rid of that awkward repetition and I got the message that my action was marked as spam (?)
      And the comment has disappeared!

      This has happened to me on occasion before 🙁 I think the filters can be very sensitive at times (the spam filter and the one that determines whether or not a response is held back for moderation). I haven’t figured out a solid criteria for why a post is marked as spam or held back for moderation but just to let you know it’s happened to me too!

        Quote  Reply

    70. Adrianacandle,

      Thank you!
      For the record, I was thanking Ten Bears about giving me some information about the GOT anniversary and saying that I had seen only some pictures. I hope the comment I’m writing now won’t disappear as well…

        Quote  Reply

    71. Shy Lady Dragon: I hope the comment I’m writing now won’t disappear as well…

      After I’ve had comments disappear into the ether, I’m always hoping for the same!

      I’ve discovered one thing that’ll get your comment held back for moderation, which is including more than two links in a post. Otherwise, I think pressing ‘Post Comment’ is a bit of a gamble with most of the odds being in your favour but there’s still a little room for your comment being held back or disappearing entirely *_*

        Quote  Reply

    72. Shy Lady Dragon:
      Ten Bears,

      I would watch a film just to see a Maisie cameo, but yeah, I hope her part is meaty!
      I don’t know much about Sex Pistols history and the connections among some characters – never heard of Jordan, I’m afraid! – but this makes everything more interesting. I had a quick look about the upcoming film. but reading your descriptions about actors and their parts puts everything in the perspective and increases my excitement.
      I must add that working in that clothes shop would be some great job! I remember traveling to Germany for the first time (in 1990) and entering a punk clothes boutique out of curiosity, where the shop assistant and few customers seemed like characters in a play! I’m afraid I was staring at them but they didn’t pay any attention to poor little boring me 🙂

      In addition to Maisie Williams as “punk fashion icon Jordan,” I’m curious to see the portrayal of a young Chrissie Hynde as Jordan’s co-worker in the King’s Road clothing store…

      (to be continued)

        Quote  Reply

    73. Shy Lady Dragon,

      Part 2 of 2

      Here are two pictures of Sydney Chandler, cast to play 1970’s Chrissie Hynde in the Sex Pistols series:

      Sydney Chandler – Image #1

      https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BZTcwMDY4MzEtZWE4NS00ZjAwLWI0NzMtNzg0OGEzYzliZGYwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTAwNzQwMzYx._V1_.jpg

      • Image #2

      https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BNDc0NmFkZTEtOWEzZi00YjRlLTg1MDAtMjI4OTAxNDI4MTY3XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTAwNzQwMzYx._V1_.jpg

      I’m sure she will look a lot different once she’s got Chrissie Hynde’s signature bangs and black leather outfits.

        Quote  Reply

    74. Shy Lady Dragon,

      Here are some photos circa 1977 of the real Jordan (to be played by Maisie Williams); the real Chrissie Hynde (to be played by Sydney Chandler); and the real Vivienne Westwood (to be played by Talullah Riley) in Malcolm McLaren & Vivienne Westwood’s “SEX” clothes store.

      https://dazedimg-dazedgroup.netdna-ssl.com/740/0-0-740-493/azure/dazed-prod/1190/5/1195516.jpg

      [From right to left: Vivienne Westwood (in white shirt), Jordan (black shirt pulled up), and Chrissie Hynde (flipping the bird).]

      ……..
      https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.1959289.1412951118!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_620_330/image.jpg

      [“Cheeky” photo. Right to left: Jordan (red “X”), Vivienne Westwood (red “E”), Chrissie Hynde (red “S”)]

      I hope Maisie is not going to be flashing her boobs, and I was kind of shocked to see soon-to-be rock superstar Chrissie Hynde in a derrière pose.

      The fanboy in me is looking forward to seeing Arya & Chrissie Hynde working together…

        Quote  Reply

    75. Adrianacandle,

      [Expanding on my reply in a more recent comments section]
      With a bit of tweaking of the lyrics, here are some songs I thought of for the singing and dancing wights and direwolves in a GoT musical

      • Wights:

      🎶 “When the sun puts out the light,
      I join the creatures of the night, 🧟‍♂️
      Oh yeah.
      I’m a sleepwalker. 🧟‍♀️
      I’m a night stalker. 🧟
      I’m a street walker.
      I’m a night hawker.”🎶

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPuKCWEtvWI

      “Sleepwalker” – The Kinks, March 1977 on The Mike Douglas Show

      • Direwolves (These lyrics may require more extensive tweaking…)

      🎶“Ah-hoo, werewolves of London 🐺
      Ah-hoo,
      Ah-hoo, werewolves of London 🐺
      Ah-hoo”
      ….
      “You hear him howling around your kitchen door
      You better not let him in
      Little old lady got mutilated late last night
      Werewolves of London again.” 🐺

      “I saw a werewolf drinking a piña colada
      at Trader Vic’s
      And his hair was perfect!” 🧛🏻‍♂️

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qae25976UgA

      Werewolves of London” (1978) – Warren Zevon

        Quote  Reply

    76. I can’t say the theatre is something that I am personally drawn too (I’ve only ever been twice though) but I do begin to feel this is over saturation of ASOIAF content if we are not careful. I’d certainly be interested to hear from anyone who attends this though and hope this site gives it some coverage, possibly even a review.

        Quote  Reply

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