George R. R. Martin’s Wild Cards optioned for television

georgerrmartin

News, as it relates to Game of Thrones, has been particularly hard to come by over the past few days and this lazy Sunday is no exception.

However, according to GRRM’s Not a Blog, his anthology series entitled Wild Cards has been picked up by Universal Cable Productions and development is set to begin immediately.

More info below the cut …

From Martin’s blog:

380492_300“The shared world of the Wild Cards diverged from our own on September 15, 1946 when an alien virus was released in the skies over Manhattan, and spread across an unsuspecting Earth. Of those infected, 90% died horribly, drawing the black queen, 9% were twisted and deformed into jokers, while a lucky 1% became blessed with extraordinary and unpredictable powers and became aces. The world was never the same.”

This is obviously good news for Martin fans who wanted to see more of his work brought to life on screen.

Martin continued on his blog by stating that he will not be involved in the project due to his exclusive development agreement with HBO. Instead, Martin’s assistant editor Melinda Snodgrass (“Star Trek: The Next Generation,” “The Outer Limits”) and Gregory Noveck will handle executive director roles.

As I am not familiar with the Wild Card series, I reached out to Johnny at Tower of the Hand who had this to say:

“I’ve only read a couple of the Wild Card books. They were fine, but they almost feel dated now. In an era where Marvel’s feel-good heroes dominate (and DC’s latest “dark” movies suck so hard), the Wild Cards may lean too much toward the anti-hero side of the spectrum. Maybe those are the heroes we deserve, but not the ones we need right now.”

Universal Cable Productions is behind USA’s “Mr. Robot,” “Colony” and “Suits,” as well as Syfy’s “12 Monkeys” and many others. 

What say you? Have you read Wild Cards and are you excited about this development? Let us know below.

-Oz

Follow Oz on Twitter.

69 responses

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    1. I’ve not read the series either, but about this quote:

      “I’ve only read a couple of the Wild Card books. They were fine, but they almost feel dated now. In an era where Marvel’s feel-good heroes dominate (and DC’s latest “dark” movies suck so hard), the Wild Cards may lean too much toward the anti-hero side of the spectrum. Maybe those are the heroes we deserve, but not the ones we need right now.”

      Don’t anti-heroes tend to do better on television than in film? Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead – you want to leave a film feeling good, but television’s format tends to prefer darker, more nuanced characters anyway, idk.

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    2. Haha I read ” George R.R.Martin’s ” and “television” and started hyperventilating because I thought this was about a GoT spinoff xD

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    3. I’ve not read the series, but Wild Cards I through V are rated: 4.0, 4.3, 4.3, 4.0, and 4.0. Not bad, but there are very few reviewers, which makes me nervous. The premise of collectively writing the series is interesting, but I imagine writers would need to be co-located and meet regularly to be truly successful at this level of collaboration. Certainly this disparate method cannot build the big moment payoffs that GoT is famous for.

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    4. r-hard:
      Is this book finished already or the television will finish it first?

      From what I can tell, it is a collection of short stories by different authors where George created the premise and collected and edited the works. I’m not sure there is an end.

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    5. Sounds very interesting, and USA and scyfy has some good shows under their belts, really hope I hear more on this series later down the road.

      Now if we could only have confirmation on that Game of thrones/a song of ice and fire spin off <3

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    6. I’m intrigued enough by this news to move the copy of volume 1 of Wild Cards that I recently acquired to the top of my To Read pile! Superhero sci-fi tends not to engross me nearly as much as high fantasy with medieval settings, but I’m willing to give it a whirl. I do like the concept of having a ‘stable’ of good authors all contributing stories to the same universe, with related characters playing by the same internal rules. The writing styles will likely vary somewhat, maybe even a lot; but such efforts sometimes pay off – like the later writers who admired Lovecraft’s work and contributed their own stories to the Cthulhu Mythos.

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    7. I have read a few stories (though not a complete novel) and found them enjoyable. The premise does have the capacity to morph into about anything the TV writers could envision so should be interesting.

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    8. I’m more interested in an HBO Game of Thrones spinoff announcement, but this is pretty darn cool. I’ve not read the books – I’m not really into reading superhero stuff, but I like watching it – Netflix’s Daredevil and Jessica Jones have really set the standard for this genre.

      As for the NBCU networks, while it might fit more with Syfy’s fare, USA tends to spend more money and does a better job promoting its series so I think that would be a good fit.

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    9. I predict big fat flop.

      No one cares about this crap, The MCU has this market cornered already and WB’s DC Universe is already moping up all the over spillage.

      Really stupid choice.

      Wonder if it will be as much a flop as ‘Vinyl’.

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    10. “the Wild Cards may lean too much toward the anti-hero side of the spectrum.” ,, Deadpool, anyone? It did better than batman v superman, surely that shows us that anti-heroes are actually the ones people want rather than reused superhero character models? Jessica Jones is another one where people were generally interested not for the superpowers but for the complex background to the characters. Mr Robot could probably also fit in that bracket as having an anti-hero much more interesting than the superheroes of Arrow and The Flash. This could work well if they execute it with good direction and acting, and a solid script with complex character narratives. We can hope, anyway.

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    11. Goddamn I’m so sick of these superhero films/series! It’s all so juvenile, yet it’s more popular than ever before. I think that speaks to the average intelligence of people these days. I just can’t fathom what people get from these utterly unrealistic, incoherent narratives. Poor choice, George. Why not Fevre Dream? Or even better, something related to A Song of Ice and Fire? I want to see less laughable CGI tomfoolery by dudes in capes and more medieval misery!

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    12. Roberto Baratheos,

      People should be able to like something without their intelligence being called into question. If you can’t respect other people’s opinions, perhaps this isn’t the right place for you.

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    13. Hear hear Young Dragon.

      @Roberto Baratheos over the years there’s been plenty of infantile nonsense written or filmed in the fantasy genre, and plenty of people willing to denigrate fantasy fans for enjoying stories about magical beings and knights and ladies with silly names. There’s no good excuse for belittling people for liking things you don’t.

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    14. Arthur,

      We have to wait and see, but I have the feeling you might be right. The MCU is everywhere and I’m fine with that, but it will be hard to find a spot for Wild Cards, especially with DC wanting a piece of the cake as well.

      Roberto Baratheos: Goddamn I’m so sick of these superhero films/series! It’s all so juvenile, yet it’s more popular than ever before. I think that speaks to the average intelligence of people these days.

      That’s an oversimplification at best. Watch something like Jessica Jones for a start and tell me again that the plot is juvenile.

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    15. Haven’t read Wild Cards, a Tuf Voyaging series/miniseries would’ve been cool though. Lots of good idea in Tuf Voyaging, and I’m almost positive that BioWare stole one of the plotlines in the Mass Effect series from that book.

      (Didn’t specify which plotline since that would imply a rather large spoiler for the book. Any Mass Effect fans who read it shouldn’t have any trouble seeing what I mean by the end though).

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    16. Mr Robot and 12 Monkeys are both really good productions, and if that’s the kind of thing that Universal Cable Productions does, then Wild Cards is in good hands.

      I suspect there’s enough Wild Cards done already that this won’t affect ASOIAF at all. George will get done when he gets done. Whenever the hell that is 🙂

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    17. I’ve read every Wild Cards book. For a long time I hoped that a wider audience would get to meet and fall in love with Ned Stark, Arya Stark, Tyrion Lannister, Jon Snow, Jaime Lannister, Daenerys Targaryen and so many others on their television screens. For not quite as long I have hoped that a wider audience would get to meet and fall in love with Cap’n Trips, Fortunato, Jack Braun, Dr. Tachyon, The Great and Powerful Turtle, Demise, Jay Ackroyd, Croyd “The Sleeper” Crenson, and so many others on their televisions as well. Like A Song of Ice and Fire these books are great, but their characters are something else entirely.

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    18. I so far read the first 7 WC books and enjoyed most of the stories very much, especially the true mosaic novels (all authors contributing to one story) are very good. The premises of this universe are very interesting and could work very well on TV. The only concern I have is that getting all the aces and jokers convincingly portrayed could require quite a few special effects which might be too expensive for TV, but we will see.
      Some of the characters are very much over-the-top. Similar to GRRMs other writing there is mostly not a simple good/bad distinction but many nuances in-between although there are a few very clear-cut villains. I am certainly looking forward to watching WC on TV.

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    19. Yan:
      Now we know how to keep this site running once Game of Thrones is over:)

      I’m afraid the final two seasons of GoT will outlive the entirety of a Wild Cards show.

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    20. ash:
      I have no interest in this at all.I want him to finish ASOIAF.That is all. Period.

      Other writings interrupt finishing ASoIaF. Is ASoIaF like construction repairs on your home: they can be interrupted but never completed?

      Monetizing completed work is understandable. However, WC are collections that were worked on in preference to ASoIaF these past several years. Do we feel like the rejected step-child?

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    21. Mihnea,

      They are worth checking out; especially the first one. I picked up the 3rd volume last week after a 3 year long break from the series and it is such a large universe with many many heroes, villains and anti-heroes; not to mention they sometimes interact with each other so subtly, so I have had to hit the wiki page hard to refresh. What Wild Card does best, much like A Song of Ice and Fire, is that they give us super heroes that are very human. Even ones like the Turtle (George’s character) who fit the archetypal hero mold, and have the strictest code of ethics are more shaped by memories and events in their past rather than some abstract credo.

      I’m really excited to see Doctor Tackyon, Croyd, Jub, Des, Captain Trips, Fortunato and Jet Boy brought to life.

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    22. ash:
      I have no interest in this at all.I want him to finish ASOIAF.That is all. Period.

      Stop being so entitled ! GRRM is not your bitch ! You can´t rush art !

      OK, did I forget something ? Should be it…

      Oh, wait: F*ck aSoIaF !! The world needs more Wild Cards !!

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    23. Darkness is not the problem with the DC movies. Good storytelling is the problem with the DC movies. The Nolan Batman series excelled because it focused on characters and had superb storytelling. Same for the Keaton Batman movies. Same for the original Superman. Same for Game of Thrones. Same for the Lord of the Rings.

      Marvel’s visuals may not be dark but a lot of the content is. Tony Stark dealing with depression and having PTSD brings about Ultron, who destroys a whole damned city. Rewatch the last two Captain America movies, and tell me that’s not heavy stuff. Just because it’s not nighttime for 67 out of 90 minutes doesn’t mean it’s not dark material.

      That said, if the storytelling is good, it doesn’t really matter what the subject matter is, it should do well so long as enough eyeballs are on the property.

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    24. I have to admit, I’ve read one Wild Cards novel and thought it was utterly cheesy.. so I never picked up another one. I liked how some characters where designed, but the whole story was.. just cliché and boring.
      I’m not a fan of superhero stuff though, that might come into play too. But I certainly am not interested. 🙁

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    25. I read several of the Wild Card series years ago… at times, the different authors’ writing styles annoyed me, but overall, I enjoyed the ones I read (all of them up to Marked Cards – the 12th book). I really enjoyed Melinda Snodgrass’ contributions in those books. Like others have said, it’ll be really difficult to bring some of these characters to life, as some of their mutations are quite physically altering. Could be quite interesting, though!

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    26. Marvel’s Netflix shows are dark and they do really well. Captain America’s last two movies are also a lot more grounded than the typical Marvel movie (which is probably why Cap has the best solo movies tbh). The problem with DC is not the movies being dark and gritty, but the bad scripts and character development. Snyder simply does not get Superman and it shows in the movie. Suicide Squad has similar problems with how the characters are written (especially when it comes to writing most of the female characters and the stereotyping of other characters)

      In the right hands, I think Wild Cards could turn out to be interesting, especially if they manage to successfully adapt what’s dated about them to reflect modern audiences.

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    27. It’s sad to see some people think that all superhero stuff is still mindless crap that can’t tell legitimately great stories. It’s the same line of thought when people say fantasy is mindless nerd stuff. But It’s not entirely their fault, I guess it doesn’t help that the film industry is full of bad writers like Zack who decide to shit on good storytelling and characters in favor of mindless action.

      Superman is so much more interesting than most people think, sadly all his films portray him as a complete retard who’s saving grace is strength and has almost none of his complexity from the good comics. Maybe one day we can get someone to make All Star Superman into a series.

      Anyway with that being said, I don’t know if it’s a good idea for a obscure series to move into the scene right now since Marvel and DC have always been the titans and will pretty much crush anything that gets between them.

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    28. WC are interesting.. for the most part. Problem is that since it is written by several authors, each focusing on specific characters, the quality varies a lot.

      The story is more grounded in reality, very similar to Watchmen, but with lots of super powers. Actually, it is like X-Men in a Watchmen setting.

      And, what’s killing DC is not dark stories (I like dark stories), but the worst, most dumb scripts ever (Lex Luthor). Also, that the story is dark doesn’t mean it can’t have some humor, at least some black humor, to vary the tone, instead of 2 hours of brooding. And to make it worse, if your story is dark, then probably you shouldn’t make it PG-13. Go full Deadpool or stick to marvel happy kid movies.

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    29. flintstonewielder: Stop being so entitled ! GRRM is not your bitch ! You can´t rush art !

      OK, did I forget something ? Should be it…

      Oh, wait: F*ck aSoIaF !! The world needs more Wild Cards !!

      Bait and switch. Soon we will all forget about ASoIaF and focus on WC.

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    30. ash:
      I have no interest in this at all.I want him to finish ASOIAF.That is all. Period.

      A poster on this site in a past year stated that he would not buy any other products by GRRM until the conclusion to ASoIaF was published. That threat has neither diminished the non-ASoIaF activities nor hastened the production of ASoIaF.

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    31. flintstonewielder: Stop being so entitled ! GRRM is not your bitch ! You can´t rush art !

      OK, did I forget something ? Should be it…

      Oh, wait: F*ck aSoIaF !! The world needs more Wild Cards !!

      Ah, sarcasm. So clever.

      Can you not see how the “gimme what I want when I want it” attitude is more appropriate to kindergartners with limited developmental capacity for deferred gratification than it is to adults?

      The prevalence of this attitude among young Americans in particular embarrasses me to be an American – not quite so much as the fact that such an appalling excuse for a human being as Donald Trump is able to attract enough supporters to get a major party nomination in my country, but still… It’s as if the dollar is some sort of all-powerful sacred talisman, instead of merely a symbolic representation of a concentration of wealth whose value waxes and wanes with the economy of the entire world.

      Threats will accomplish nothing. Withheld approval will accomplish nothing. Readers/consumers cannot make an author do what we want. We all need to accept that fact and move on. There are many and more wonderful books waiting to be read in the meantime.

      Besides, this TV deal is all irrelevant to the completion schedule for WotW anyway. George isn’t writing or producing or even executive producing it. He just owns the publishing rights.

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    32. Anonne:
      Darkness is not the problem with the DC movies.Good storytelling is the problem with the DC movies.The Nolan Batman series excelled because it focused on characters and had superb storytelling.Same for the Keaton Batman movies.Same for the original Superman.Same for Game of Thrones.Same for the Lord of the Rings.

      Marvel’s visuals may not be dark but a lot of the content is.Tony Stark dealing with depression and having PTSD brings about Ultron, who destroys a whole damned city.Rewatch the last two Captain America movies, and tell me that’s not heavy stuff.Just because it’s not nighttime for 67 out of 90 minutes doesn’t mean it’s not dark material.

      That said, if the storytelling is good, it doesn’t really matter what the subject matter is, it should do well so long as enough eyeballs are on the property.

      After seeing Suicide Squad this weekend, I think DC’s problems are: casting (with the exception of Margot Robbie); writing (WTF was going on with Enchantress’ brother? I think maybe two more minutes of explanation into the siblings back story could have done wonders); and the money people/heads of studio who gave the green light for these ideas.

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    33. Firannion,

      I don’t think you are familiar with many “young Americans”. Or if you are, we have different definitions. After reading your comment, I thought of people aged between 17-28. Now the 16 and under set, you’re right, they’re children.

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    34. I’m intrigued. I haven’t read the books, but I do like the X-Men, and the thinking of the infinite possibilities of powers one could possess. And SyFy is doing great things, The Magicians just one of them. It also doesn’t hurt to have NBC as a parent.

      The following were announced this year:

      – NBCUniversal’s Universal Cable Productions unveiled the television adaptation of SEVERAL sci-fi comics for a young audience including “Interworld” by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reeves and The “Umbrella Academy” by Jeremy Slater.

      – Van Helsing, which will premiere on September 23,

      And on the DC front, SyFy optioned Booster Gold, the time-traveling superhero for a series about five years ago. They’ve been sitting on it since then, but some sites think it’s in development for 2017. Hopefully it will be something similar in feel to Daredevil, but with a Doctor Who vibe.

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    35. Well GRRM was influenced and inspired into writing ASOIAF by reading The Accursed Kings series by Maurice Druon. In between the 6th and 7th and final gap of that there was a 17 year wait!

      This does not encourage me for some reason 😉

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    36. MeeraReed:
      Firannion,

      I don’t think you are familiar with many “young Americans”. Or if you are, we have different definitions.After reading your comment, I thought of people aged between 17-28.Now the 16 and under set, you’re right, they’re children.

      We likely do have different definitions; from my perspective as a Baby Boomer, any of my compatriots from Gen X (the so-called “Me Generation”) and after qualifies as a “young American.” My own Millennial kid and his college friends seem to exhibit less of this sort of “entitled” behavior than a lot of people I encounter in the late-20s-to-early-40s range, but I’m not sure how much of that is generational per se and how much a function of the fact that they’re attending the real-world equivalent of Brakebills!

      In any case, childish behavior/attitudes can manifest at any age – though unrealistic expectations do seem to be at least partially molded by upbringing and socioeconomic class. Much (though certainly not all) of my age cohort managed to escape compulsive consumerism as a result of having had parents who vividly remembered the Great Depression and knew how to get by with less “stuff.” In a way, that perspective seems to be coming around again, with today’s emphasis on sustainability.

      So I’m not entirely unhopeful about modern youth. I just don’t suffer “entitled” people (or even literary characters) gladly.

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    37. MeeraReed,

      After seeing Suicide Squad this weekend, I think DC’s problems are: casting (with the exception of Margot Robbie); writing (WTF was going on with Enchantress’ brother? I think maybe two more minutes of explanation into the siblings back story could have done wonders); and the money people/heads of studio who gave the green light for these ideas.

      DC’s problem is simple… Their movies are heavily influenced by corperate executives that don’t know shit about or care about the actual characters.

      Sure, Marvel has corporate involved with their stuff as well, but mostly just in marketing and toys and stuff like that, not scenes in the movie or character plots.

      DC however has cooperate executive fingers all over the place.

      Disney lets Marvel handle their stuff. Marvel gets people who love the characters and know the characters just as good, if not even better, then the hardcore fans.

      Until DC develops a chain of command that mirrors Marvel’s (Keeping corporate executives who know nothing about the characters out of it) their movies will continue to suffer.

      This woman explains it perfectly how WB runs their DC franchise compared to Disney and why Disney’s way is so successful if you want to watch.

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    38. Firannion,

      Have you heard of or read The Fourth Turning? Basically a look into “generational archetypes”. Super interesting stuff, and relates directly to what you mentioned observing in your generation, mine, and your kid’s.

      On topic: This sounds cool. I haven’t read wild cards, but the synopsis is intriguing. As soon as I saw this headline, my first thought was “cue the complainers”

      I still don’t fully understand the divide between “book purists” and “show apologists”- it’s effortless for me to enjoy both, without exacting judgement on the people responsible for bringing these stories to life.

      Thank you,
      flintstonewielder,

      for being so predictable. I would be worried about your well being if you didn’t show up with your baseless, asinine, entitled, and cowardly style of bitching. If you are so disappointed with this reality, why don’t you go create one more to your liking?

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    39. Sister Kisser: Have you heard of or read The Fourth Turning? Basically a look into “generational archetypes”. Super interesting stuff, and relates directly to what you mentioned observing in your generation, mine, and your kid’s.

      Wow, thanks for the reference. It does look extremely interesting! Will have to add it to my reading pile. I hope that the authors are right about the current trend being for heightened interest in the “commonweal” over devil-take-the-hindmost individualism and personal gain.

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    40. Firannion,

      We shall see. We are so fragmented, and people are drawn to all types of shortsighted nonsense these days. They do trace this generational cycle back a few hundred years, so hopefully we remain on track for continued evolution and sustainability.
      Glad you find it interesting. ?

      flintstonewielder,

      I will say, my response to you was harsh, glad you took it in stride. I suppose my own bitching is directed at the general crowd of people who take any mention of GRRM doing anything other than thrones as an opportunity to shit on him- the guy who created the thing they revere so much. Doesn’t make sense to me.
      FWIW, in general, I find a lot of your comments to be quite funny, and typically with great timing.

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    41. Sister kisser: people who take any mention of GRRM doing anything other than thrones as an opportunity to shit on him- the guy who created the thing they revere so much.

      I am repeatedly reminded of a scary scene in a cartoon from my youth, in which the angry peasants are sharpening an axe to behead the goose that laid the golden egg!

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    42. flintstonewielder:
      Sister Kisser,

      But I like this reality. It´s highly amusing.

      Typical young American: so easily amused.

      Wild Cards is niche brain candy. I haven’t read but a few excerpts and descriptions, but I can say it is true to its roots: a transcription of a Marvel RPG session run by a horny teenage boy with a penchant for gore.

      Here’s a pretty good nutshell: http://www.therobotsvoice.com/2011/11/10_things_you_should_know_before_reading_george_rr.php

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    43. The problem I often have with super-hero stories is that the basic premises – whatever made them super and what “rules” they have to play by – are extremely random (X-men for instance) and/or isn’t rational at all. (Yes, I know, super-hero stuff isn’t rooted in reality as we know it, but that doesn’t mean anything should go without questions asked.)

      I haven’t read Wild Cards, but reading this on GRRM’s Not a Blog:

      The shared world of the Wild Cards diverged from our own on September 15, 1946 when an alien virus was released in the skies over Manhattan, and spread across an unsuspecting Earth. Of those infected, 90% died horribly, drawing the black queen, 9% were twisted and deformed into jokers, while a lucky 1% became blessed with extraordinary and unpredictable powers and became aces. The world was never the same.

      I have hope and fear in equal measures that the bounds to which this reality holds will be consistent for all players or be totally random again…

      Any readers of the series able to comment on that?

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    44. Tar Kidho: The problem I often have with super-hero stories is that the basic premises – whatever made them super and what “rules” they have to play by – are extremely random (X-men for instance) and/or isn’t rational at all. (Yes, I know, super-hero stuff isn’t rooted in reality as we know it, but that doesn’t mean anything should go without questions asked.)

      If you feel that way (as do I to an extend, even though I can enjoy most super hero movies/TV shows regardless) you should give Jessica Jones a try. It still has somewhat unexplained super hero stuff in it, but they try very hard to not make it the typical super hero story and part of that is to make it as realistic as they can without losing the supernatural elements. – The most interesting part about the show is, that at its core I wouldn’t even call it a super hero story, a term like ‘psychological thriller’ gets much closer to what Jessica Jones really is about.

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    45. Tar Kidho: I have hope and fear in equal measures that the bounds to which this reality holds will be consistent for all players or be totally random again…

      Any readers of the series able to comment on that?

      Well, as I said in a previous comment, the characters are written by different authors, so that means that you can find a great character like “The Great and Powerful Turtle” written by Martin, which is a telekinetic that modified a car with battleship armor and cameras to see, so he could fight while he was protected inside this “shell” (the shell flies since he can lift it in the air). Pretty logical and great idea, right?

      But then, you also have characters like Fortunato, which uses some weird sexual tantric magic that can do pretty much everything. In a world with mutants and super powers he uses magic. It is so out of context that I basically ended up skipping his chapters.

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    46. I introduced my ex to GRR Martin via Game of Thrones around the end of S2. She’s a writer herself (unpublished) and just loves all the Wild Card books. I haven’t gotten into them myself, but I respect her opinion on this sort of things a lot.

      Though I still don’t get her love for Neil Gaiman. Maybe that’s why we’re no longer together. 😛

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    47. Firannion,

      How did I know you were a Baby Boomer? Just so you know, the despise you have for the Millennials is shared right back at you by them. I don’t think the next 20 years will be your favorite.

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    48. orange:
      Firannion,

      How did I know you were a Baby Boomer? Just so you know, the despise you have for the Millennials is shared right back at you by them. I don’t think the next 20 years will be your favorite.

      You misread me totally if you think I despise Millennials. As I have said, my own son is among them, and I have a lot of respect for most of his cohort whom I have met. They seem much more politically and socially committed than the (often shallow and self-indulgent) Gen Xers who preceded them. The kids coming up today and the antiwar ’60s counterculture – my cohort – actually seem to have a lot in common.

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    49. Firannion: They seem much more politically and socially committed than the (often shallow and self-indulgent) Gen Xers who preceded them.

      Wow. Way to paint with an exceptionally broad brush. I’m glad most of the Boomers with whom I’m familiar and with whom I’ve worked aren’t nearly so judgemental.

      btw – It’s the Baby Boomers who are often referred to as the “Me Generation,” although in many cases, I find that quite an unfair characterization.

      On another note, is there really a character in Wild Cards named Cap’n Trips??? Captain Trips was one of Jerry Garcia’s nicknames. Knowing Martin is a big deadhead, I’m guessing he’s the one who came up with that character.

      Speaking of Jerry, he passed away 21 years ago, today.

      https://scontent.cdninstagram.com/t51.2885-15/e35/11428640_1459483114377919_1731224356_n.jpg?ig_cache_key=MTA0OTM2MzA2NDIwODM2MDI2OA%3D%3D.2

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    50. Sister kisser,

      Girl…all things aSoIaF/GRRM are being taken way too seriously, especially by a pretty rabid hardcore fanbase. I take the piss out of that, I get clobbered, we rinse and repeat, we have more fun and live crawls on until the next GoT season.

      And Cumsprite is chronically pissed because there´s only one boss hog PENIS in this board and his name is Rygar. Chew on that, Sprite !!

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    51. Seeing that only 2 out of 12 of the prominent characters are women doesn’t exactly excite me as a potential viewer. Just my gut reaction when I checked out the wiki. Kinda burned out on the ‘people dealing with sudden super powers’ premise behind it, too, but I will still give it a chance when it airs.

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    52. Hi Abyss and Winter is delayed,

      Thanks for your inputs! (and sorry for the late reply) Telekinesis versus weird sexual tantric power sounds pretty random indeed 🙂 So I remain wary, and it doesn’t sound like something I’m interested in reading anyway, but if it makes it to the small screen, I’ll surely be giving it a go. In the meantime I’ll try out Jessica Jones.

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    53. Nymeria Warrior Queen: Wow.Way to paint with an exceptionally broad brush.I’m glad most of the Boomers with whom I’m familiar and with whom I’ve worked aren’t nearly so judgemental.

      All generalizations are bogus anyway.

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    54. Started reading the first Wild Cards collection. Happy to discover that it’s more than just post-Apocalyptic superhero fluff. Just read a story that digs deeply into McCarthyism and the HUAC. Nice to be reminded that good sci-fi sometimes wrestles with real sociopolitical issues! I need to get back into it.

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    55. Nymeria Warrior Queen,

      As somebody who arrived for the tale end of Generation X, I feel pretty fortunate to have seen the dead on their last tour, as a freshman in high school. RIP Jerry. Crazy to think its been that long. My first exposure to them was watching and loving the ‘I will survive’ video on mtv as a kid, a live video with a little added production to make it interesting (the skeleton morph and the dog running off with one of the drummers leg bones….) Obviously, that was the tip of the iceberg for me. Interesting Capt. Trips connection.

      And I agree on your take on the baby boomer “me generation” characterization- Sheer excess in so many ways, one could say they were the ultimate entitled generation. The flipside of that is the volume of social change they were able to push through because it was clear to them that, for instance, there are certain rights everyone should be entitled to and that life had to be legislated to reflect that. I suppose the blade cuts both ways. There are genuinely good people as well as self-serving assholes in every generation, and any attempt to broadly generalize should reflect the numbers in aggregate, while recognizing there will be countless individual counterexamples to be found for any given characterization.

      Firannion,

      I resent your GenX remark! (like I said, I caught the tail end- but I grew up watching Nirvana basically destroy hair metal and the corporate rock that had dominated the 80’s, so my perspective is filtered- but all my friends and I grew up brimming with angst for the narcissistic self-indulgence and apathetic corporate circle jerk that came before us- yes, in the earlier years of my generational cohort)

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    56. flintstonewielder,

      Fred, I am familiar with you and your crew, but thanks for the introduction anyway. Reminds me of a group of dudes who talk about getting laid all the time, but never actually get laid. So you roll together, following around your Boss Hog Penis (who is actually funny), hoping for some scraps. The problem is that you are stuck in a cycle with no release- he never comes through, because he isn’t getting laid either. Nobody is ever satisfied. Makes for (some) good entertainment.

      As for crazy rabid fandoms and entitlement. I think my opinion on the matter has become more nuanced over the years. I have sympathy for readers who have been growing more anxious, waiting years for the conclusion to a story they love. I still see malevolent remarks and even whiny bitching directed at the author as the cowardly expressions of malcontents given a platform here on the internet. I do agree with Neil Gaiman- GRRM is not your bitch. He is as equally entitled to take his sweet time (and possibly never finish) as you are to pass judgement on him. That said, I think I have finally outgrown my naive hope that he would finish TWOW before DnD finish the series. I will be very surprised if this happens.

      Also, you can call me what you like, but “girl” misses the mark. I’m a dude.

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