Game of Thrones Memory Lane 210: Valar Morghulis

ValarMorghulis

“Valar Morghulis,” written by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss and directed by Alan Taylor, wraps up Game of Thrones season 2’s many storylines in a satisfactory (or else deliberately unsatisfactory) manner. Having watched all the way through season 5, however, it’s also fair to call “Valar Morghulis” a compilation of retrospectively excruciating scenes that leaves one shouting advice to the characters on screen.

This gif comes to mind repeatedly.
Eldoradogif Tyrion wakes after the Battle of the Blackwater to one of the most unsettling sights imaginable…

Pycelle

“Good morning, sunshine”

… and quickly learns that all the political footholds he acquired over the course of the season unraveled while he lay comatose in bed. Varys promises to remember his service to the city, even if the history books don’t, but Tyrion only finds true solace with Shae. She removes the bandages to reveal a hideous, grotesque red line across an otherwise unblemished face and reaffirms her commitment to him with their mantra, “I am yours and you are mine.” She holds him as he cries. It’s a tough scene to watch when you know where their relationship is going.

Brienne and Jaime continue their verbal sparring match but we also see Jaime’s first glimpse of grudging respect for Brienne as she makes short work of three Stark soldiers. I don’t have anything insightful to say about the scene, other than that their relationship at this stage reminds me of another duo I saw recently.

Brienne

NickJudy Anyone else pick up on this?

A sleep-deprived Theon Greyjoy, truly at the end of his rope, listens to the sounds of the Bolton siege outside as Maester Luwin wearily tries to advise him.

Theonsad1

I should say, here, that it is with great restraint that I’m not dedicating this entire post to this scene. Because I love it. I love it so much. I love the lighting, I love the camera angles, I love the score, I love the acting and I love the writing. I. Love. Love. It.

Theon’s tight-lipped tirade when Maester Luwin reminds him how well Ned Stark treated him as a ward perfectly captures the impossible circumstances he’s grown up under.

Yes, my captors were so very kind to me you love reminding me of that. Everyone in this frozen pile of shit has always loved reminding me of that. Do you know what it’s like to be told how lucky you are to be someone’s prisoner? To be told how much you owe them?

He’s too much a Greyjoy to be a Stark and yet too much a Stark to be a Greyjoy. Alfie Allen has discussed this aspect of Theon’s conflict at length (start at 2:16).

“He has love, he has it in his heart, but that means he wants to be loved and he’s never really gotten it. Ned Stark’s probably put his arm around his shoulder at some point, but he’s never really taught him the right and wrong way of life, and apart from Ned he never really had a role model. That’s where the conflict comes in his mind, this mental torture happens because no one is telling him right from wrong. He’s crying out for someone to tell him what to do, and he never really gets it and that’s why he makes so many brash decisions.” – Alfie Allen, Interview with Westeros.org.

Luwin implores Theon to escape to the Wall, insisting that he’s not the man he’s pretending to be. Theon’s response is as poignant as it is incorrect:

You may be right, but I’ve come too far to pretend to be anything else.

You’d think so, Theon, but … no.

In the courtyard, Theon gives his infamous Henry V/”Tonight we dine in Hell”/YOLO speech, during which he makes The Face.

TheonFace

Halfway through his battle cry, Dagmer knocks him out and stabs Luwin when he tries to intervene. The ironborn drag Theon away to hand him over to the Boltons so that they can get flayed alive go home.

Thus one Theon Greyjoy character arc ends … and another begins.

Arya escapes Harrenhal and learns about the shape-shifting powers of the Faceless Men in Braavos. Jaqen invites her to come with him and, though, tempted, she refuses because she needs to take care of her family first. Jaqen hands her a coin and teaches her those famous words, “Valar Morghulis” – though we don’t find out what they mean just yet.

In the House of the Undying, Daenerys rejects visions of Khal Drogo and baby Rhaego in order to rescue her dragons. Now, I consider myself a pretty staunch Mirri Maz Duur apologist (yeah, I know I’m heartless but the last time I checked, stopping someone from taking over the world was a good-guy thing to do) but even I can’t deny the adorableness of baby Rhaego or the heartbreak as Daenerys turns away from Khal Drogo. (Trivia: the baby is played by the daughter of GoT’s principal stills photographer Helen Sloan.)

Rhaego

It’s a literalization of her mantra in the books, “If I look back, I am lost,” though maybe a better comparison would be to the Mirror of Erised from Harry Potter: an illusion so enticing you don’t care that it’s not real.

The season ends on a foreboding note as Sam, Grenn and Edd hear three blasts of the horn and run for it. Sam takes cover behind a rock and gets a look at a White Walker and an army of wights making their way slowly but surely towards the Wall.
Wighs


Retrospectively important and/or painful moments

  • Theon’s refusal to return to the Iron Islands for fear of being laughed at is a reminder of just how much dignity he has to lose.
  • Robb and Talisa’s wedding, set to Djawadi’s gorgeous score piece, “I Am Hers, She is Mine.”

  • Tyrion and Shae’s scene. Every second those two are on screen together, another piece of my heart breaks off.
  • Ros agreeing to spy for Varys
  • Jaqen gives Arya the coin and the phrase she’ll need to get to Braavos
  • Petyr Baelish reminding Sansa that Joffrey can still abuse her even though they’re no longer engaged and promising to protect her by returning her to Winterfell leaves a really bitter taste after the events of season 5.
  • Tyrion’s lack of recognition for saving the city and Varys’ promise to remember comes back ’round during his trial.
  • Stannis’ dismay after his defeat at the Battle of the Blackwater is but a sample of what he experiences in “Mother’s Mercy.”

Luwin

Memorable quotes

Maester Luwin to Bran and Rickon: “I pulled you into the world, both of you. I’ve seen both your faces almost every day since and for that I consider myself very … very lucky.”

Daenerys (about Xaro’s treasure): “Real enough to buy a ship?” Aw, she thinks she’s heading to Westeros in the near future … that’s so cute!

Catelyn to Robb: “Your father didn’t love me when we married. He hardly knew me or I him. Love didn’t just happen to us. We built is slowly over the years, stone by stone. For you. For your brothers and sisters. For all of us. It’s not as exciting as secret passion in the woods but it is stronger. It lasts longer.”

Varys to Tyrion: “There are many who know that without you this city faced certain defeat. The king won’t give you any honors. The history books won’t mention you. But we will not forget.”

Illusion!Khal Drogo: “Maybe I refused to enter the Night Lands with you. Maybe I told the Great Stallion to go fuck himself and came back here to wait for you.”

Creative Fandom

Tyrion

Source; Adam Rifkin

Source: Adam Rifkin

http://brienneofthrace.tumblr.com/post/78587472138/i-found-a-gif-that-is-a-perfect-metaphor-for-theon

TheonTheoff

Theonmemoir

Beautiful Death for “Valar Morghulis”

PrinceofWinterfell

33 responses

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    1. Another excellent trip down memory lane. And Season 2 is now remembered, and we have only a month to go until the premiere. The wait is getting easier.

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    2. There have been many deaths on this show, and many of more important characters, but still, five seasons in, not one death affects me more than Maester Luwin. It’s still such a gut-punch. It was a lovely scene in the book, and all the more so thanks to Donald Sumpter’s great, lived-in performance as Luwin. I get choked up every time I hear the dialogue, and even as he winces in pain when Bran and Rickon first see him, you can see him smiling, if only a bit, when he learns the boys have survived the sack of Winterfell:

      “They burned it, they burned everything.”

      “Not everything. Not YOU.”

      It’s devastating.

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    3. The only quibble I have with Theon’s very strong Season 2 story is that between not casting Ramsay this season and wanting to keep the activity of the Boltons secret, the ending comes across very muddled. I recall a lot of viewers were irritated about this, particularly since it wasn’t initially clear to many that it was supposed to be a mystery. Regardless, great acting from Allen and Sumpter — and farewell to the latter, a very solid supporting castmember for two seasons.

      Pycelle momentarily dropping the frail old man guise to taunt Tyrion is a really well done moment.

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    4. This is my second favourite episode from Season 2 (The first one’s What Is Dead May Never Diee).
      The exclusion of the House of the Undying visions from the books may bother some people, but I think seeing the Iron Throne covered in snow (or is it ashes? Was it ever confirmed?) works as a prophecy of what may be coming with winter to Westeros – possibly if Dany doesn’t arrive, possibly even if she does –, and as a temptation, the idea that if Dany actually sits on the Iron Throne, she will never be able to get out from the HotU.

      I consider myself a pretty staunch Mirri Maz Duur apologist

      Me too.

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    5. Greatjon of Slumber,

      oh my goodness i agree. even with arya/tywin, arya/jaqen, and cersei/everyone, i think that maester luwin’s scenes were my favorite part of season 2. it was so great to see him treating bran/rickon/osha, and especially theon, with such understanding. it hit me like a pile of bricks to see him go 🙁

      on an other note: i love dany, but i’m also a staunch mirri maz duur apologist.

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    6. Great write up. This episode contains two of my favourite scenes – Luwin’s death (sob) and Robb / Talisa wedding. The music in the latter is just… sublime.

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    7. After the brilliance that was “Blackwater”, “Valar Morghulis” is definitely one the show’s quieter finales. Yet it has some excellent character moments and after watching Season 5, God, the foreshadowing is just everywhere.

      Jaqen giving Arya the coin and promising they’ll meet again is an obvious example, as is Catelyn warning Robb about treating his oaths recklessly. But we also see Tyrion and Shae talk about fleeing to Pentos, (which he will later do without her – after killing her, in fact), and Littlefinger promising Sansa he’ll help get her home (which he does – but it’s anything but a safe haven).

      Speaking of foreshadowing, it’s eerie how much Stannis’s conversation with Melisandre in this episode predicts his ultimate fate. I must say that after rewatching Stannis’s Season 2 arc, I was consistently struck by how much I enjoyed this first chapter of his story, now that we know the end. It really does tie together extremely well.

      Thousands will die at your command. You will betray the men serving you. You will betray your family. You will betray everything you once held dear. And it will all be worth it. Because you are the son of fire. You are the warrior of light. You will sweep aside this pretender and that one. You will be king.”

      Stannis even has a moment where he seems aghast at what he did to Renly, and Melisandre asks him to share the weight with her. Yet when the time comes, she abandons him, and he’s left to face the ultimate consequence of that fateful decision – which takes the shape of Brienne and her sword – alone.

      “Three blasts?”/”RUN!” Still a chilling moment, and a very effective end to Season 2. Shout out to Dolorous Edd – the only ranger who will survive both the Fist of the First Men and Hardhome (and the mutiny at Craster’s Keep and the Battle at the Wall, for that matter). If any human being deserves to have such a morbid attitude after all that, he does.

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    8. That Stannis scene is incredibly interesting in retrospect. I wonder if Melisandre telling him “You will betray your family” was at all related to Shireen. I suppose it could also be a way of setting up the Gendry arc in Season 3, but either way it works fantastically as foreshadowing.

      Edit: Damn you Jared, you’re a monster. And you wrote it better.

      A very solid finale, only the rushed Qhorin scene is a particular blight.

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    9. Like Petra, I also love the heart-to-heart conversation that Theon has with Luwin about everything he’s done. Perhaps it wasn’t too late for him, yet Theon can’t see a way out, and his surprisingly insightful self-analysis dooms him when he determines that he’s gone too far to pretend to be anything else. Watching Theon deliver his rallying cry is thrilling, but also awkward, because it’s painfully clear to everyone but him that the moment will end with him being cold-cocked by Dagmer and the others. But hey, it was a good speech.

      Knowing that Ramsay winds up flaying them all the Ironborn who think they’re getting a free passage home, watching them truss up Theon and prepare to walk straight into the Boltons’ jaws is perversely satisfying. Maybe you should have taken Theon up on his proposal of a glorious last stand, fellas.

      Bran and Rickon emerging from the crypts to find Winterfell burned is one of the more quietly devastating moments of the entire series. The final passage of ACOK is perhaps my favorite ending to any ASOIAF chapter, give or take the ending of AGOT.

      The stone is strong, Bran told himself, the roots of the trees go deep, and under the ground the Kings of Winter sit their thrones. So long as those remained, Winterfell remained. It was not dead, just broken. Like me, he thought. I’m not dead either.

      Translating that precise moment of internal reflection into spoken dialogue would have been hard, but the show manages to craft an equivalent gut punch. We get an deeply affecting moment when Bran and Rickon discover Luwin dying in the godswood. “They burned it down. They burned everything!” Bran exclaims, to which Luwin quietly responds “Not everything. Not you.” That always gets me. Add to that to Luwin pleading with Osha – both to keep the Stark boys safe and for the mercy of a quick death – and throw in that final shot of Winterfell burning in the distance as the Winterfell theme plays. That’s it – I’m wrecked.

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    10. I just love this scene which culminates in Theon’s epic speech to his men and starts with:

      “I will kill that man. I don’t care how many arrows they feather me with. How many spears they run through me… I will kill that horn blowing cunt before I fall!”

      Then as he starts to tell Maester Luwin: “The first time I saw Winterfell… ” then that looks he gives when the horn sounds again is brilliant (1 minute into the video below). You can tell Theon is really pissed off by that horn blower (who may well have been Ramsey for all we know) 😉

      Superb acting by Alfie Allan and for me one of the most memorable scenes ever in GoT. Another piece of brilliant writing by D&D for the show which never happens in the book.

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    11. Finally, I have to say that I’ve grown to quite like the show’s take on the House of the Undying sequence. No, it’s nothing like the equivalent chapter in the book, which is extremely dense and worthy of all the analysis that has been showered on it. In my opinion, however, it is utterly useless to compare the to its book counterpart. That extended vision quest, featuring a dozen elaborate prophecies and foreshadowings that may not come true for years, or not at all – is pretty much #1 on any list of scenes that Game of Thrones was never going to be able to adapt, even if they’d have more time and a much larger budget than they did in Season 2.

      I was admittedly disappointed on my first viewing, but that feeling has all but evaporated over the years. Expecting the show to dive into such arcane things that might never pay off is a fool’s errand. Would it have been cool if the show had thrown in a few scattered glimpses of Dany’s book visions – say Rhaegar holding a baby talking about the Prince that was Promised or the blue flower in a wall of ice? Sure. But the scene needed to service Dany’s arc in Season 2, not twelve potential arcs for multiple characters several seasons later (this is especially true for things like the foreshadowing of the Red Wedding, which has essentially no effect on Dany’s story).

      The best thing to do is judge the sequence on its own merits, and the visions the show does use are ones that I feel are quite significant. Dany in the snow-covered throne room is a striking image, approaching the Iron Throne and reaching out for it … but never touching it. Instead, she follows the call of her dragons to the Wall. Then she finds a Dothraki tent, enters it, and is reunited with her beloved husband and the child that she never got to meet.

      I remember there were rumors before the episode aired that Jason Momoa was going to return and make a cameo during the House of the Undying sequence. But actually seeing Drogo was still a fist-pumping moment, though the scene is quite a heartbreaking one.

      I particularly love the image when Dany and Drogo press their foreheads together, the line between death and dream growing ever more uncertain, and Drogo says “And if this is a dream, I will kill the man who tries to wake me.” When Dany repeats Mirri Maz Duur’s words and finds the strength to turn and leave, the look on Drogo’s face is devastating.

      This isn’t a particularly original thought, but I believe this series of visions could wind up foreshadowing Dany’s arc in the show. She arrives in Westeros, only a devastating war and the arrival of winter prevent her from ever sitting on the Iron Throne. Instead she heads North, plays a role in the Great War, and ultimately gives her life, at which point she is reunited with her family in the Night Lands. Regardless of whatever literal or figurative interpretation that scene may have, it will definitely be interesting to revisit after the series ends.

      The climax of that sequence pays off nicely as well. The image of the dragons shooting fire past Daenerys to burn the warlock is one I’ve always liked. Dany’s time in Qarth isn’t the most beloved storyline, but this is a worthy conclusion to it.

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    12. JaredWe get an deeply affecting moment when Bran and Rickon discover Luwin dying in the godswood. “They burned it down. They burned everything!” Bran exclaims, to which Luwin quietly responds “Not everything. Not you.”

      It also a nice throwback to Theon burning the two farm boys to make them appear as Bran and Rickon

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    13. My favourite line from that scene between Theon and Maester Luwin is definitely:

      “Thank you, wise bald man…”

      Gets me every time!

      Also, I wonder how many times Theon thought that perhaps going to The Wall and risking Jon Snow cutting his throat as he slept wasn’t such a bad option after all while he was hanging from Ramsay’s cross?

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    14. And so Season 2 comes to a close: with an excellent hour of TV. If this season stumbled a bit here and there (though not nearly to the level some would have it), Blackwater and Valar Morghulis certainly made up for it. For all the great episodes this remarkable show has produced, I still think this is among the most emotional and poignant ones.

      Shae coming to console Tyrion and convince him to leave Westeros with her is no-contest the best scene these two have ever had. Every line of dialogue, every little nuance is pitch perfect. Tyrion shamed by his injuries and afraid Shae would leave him (because self-loathing and deep shame are never far beneath the surface), teetering on the edge of tears, admitting that, despite all, his days in King’s Landing are the best he’s ever had.

      I do belong here. These bad people… are what I’m good at. Outtalking them, outthinking them… it’s what I am. And I like it. I like it more than anything I’ve ever done… Are you going to leave? To which Shae responds: You have a shit memory. I am yours and you are mine. And Tyrion breaks into tears…

      Simply brilliant. It’s scenes like this that make me appreciate this episode so much. And there’s more where that came from.

      How about Theon? A lifetime of being Greyjoy by blood and Stark by upbringing, a lifetime of choices made for him and not by him. What is he to his true father? A son and heir or a chess piece given away without so much as a thought? Both? Neither? And what is he to the people he spent his formative years with? A friend, comrade in arms… a brother? Or a ward… and prisoner with a sword never far from his neck? Both? Neither?

      The scene with Theon and Luwin perfectly encapsulates the plight of a man torn to pieces by inability to come decide who he is. Luwin is the angel on Theon’s shoulder, calm and reassuring, who reminds him of and appeals to his better nature, that not all is lost, that there is still time to choose who he truly is, who he wants to be. The devil on the other shoulder that in the end convinces Theon that he’s gone too far to pretend he’s anything else? The devil is everything outside that dimly lit room: the weight of history, the weight of his father’s expectations, the damn horn blaring outside the walls… In that instant, Theon had one last chance to choose for himself. To quote him from a later episode: [He] chose wrong and burned everything down.

      Let me stop here because this wall of text doesn’t need more bricks in it, but I will mention Dany last temptation in the House of the Undying — kudos to the show for bringing back Jason Momoa — and the farewell to dying Luwin as two highlights that would be a crime to skip.

      With the second season ending on such a high note, I say: Bring on Season 3!

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    15. cosca:
      That Stannis scene is incredibly interesting in retrospect. I wonder if Melisandre telling him “You will betray your family” was at all related to Shireen. I suppose it could also be a way of setting up the Gendry arc in Season 3, but either way it works fantastically as foreshadowing.

      Edit: Damn you Jared, you’re a monster. And you wrote it better.

      A very solid finale, only the rushed Qhorin scene is a particular blight.

      Sorry about that. 🙂 I didn’t mean to jump in and steal your thunder. But it’s a very interesting point, and worth discussing.

      It’s unclear whether or not that quote was meant to foreshadow Shireen’s sacrifice at the time. As you say, they may have been setting up Gendry. I think that the big sitdown between Benioff & Weiss and George about the endgame happened between Seasons 2 and 3 … or maybe it was between Seasons 3 and 4? Either way, Shireen was initially only supposed to be a one-season character, IIRC. Her role got significantly expanded thanks to Kerry Ingram’s wonderful performance and the revelation that she would be important later.

      But, ultimately, it doesn’t really matter what the original intention was. The dialogue’s there, and on future rewatches, Shireen’s sacrifice is going to be the only thing I think of when I watch that scene. I expect that’s true for many people. That’s the beauty of a well-told story told through this medium! When it’s over, you can go back and find hidden gems like this one that weren’t apparent at the time. And those moments can be incredibly powerful, regardless of whether or not they were part of the “grand plan” from the start.

      I agree with you about the Qhorin scene, but I’ve written about that enough. Better things are coming for Jon in Season 3, and indeed the rest of the series.

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    16. Jared,

      I briefly toyed with the (daunting) idea to make another wall of text to fully address the scene with Drogo as well as the one with Luwin under the weirwood, but having read your customarily great take on them, I feel I have nothing more to add.

      My compliments.

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    17. Mr Fixit,

      Thanks 🙂 I really enjoyed reading your assessment of the scene between Tyrion and Shae, by the way. That may be my favorite scene that those two characters share in this entire series, and you nailed exactly why.

      I really do need to cut down on my walls of text, yet I swear this one happened pretty much by accident. I actually didn’t think I would have much to say on “Valar Morghulis”“, yet lo and behold, I wrote far more than I expected. It tends to be the episodes on which I don’t think I’ll have a lot to say that I wind up going long on. All that proves is how rich of a show Game of Thrones is – and how hopeless I can be when I don’t have an easy way to keep track of my word count. I’ve started drafting comments in Word so that I can shame myself into brevity. It’s a slow process. 😉

      By contrast, I knew I could ramble for hours about “Blackwater”, so I deliberately cut myself off. That piece wound up being one of the shorter ones I’ve written on these Memory Lanes. Also, BryndenBFish did a superb job recapping that episode. There wasn’t much I could add.

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    18. Jared,

      No, no, no, walls of text are so much fun to read! Don’t shorten them! This site is devoted to Martin’s world. If we can’t write walls of texts about a series based on 5 walls of text (with at least 2 more incoming), where on Earth to write them? 😉

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    19. Another reason why I believe Stannis is still alive. That’s pretty lame writing if Melisandre was just lying all along about the prophecy. In season 5, she clearly seems surprised by what’s happening, so that doesn’t seem the case. She says “You will betray the men serving you, you will betray your family.” So far he’s only betrayed his family, he still needs to betray his men (and I think it will be Davos).

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    20. LatrineDiggerBrian:
      Another reason why I believe Stannis is still alive. That’s pretty lame writing if Melisandre was just lying all along about the prophecy. In season 5, she clearly seems surprised by what’s happening, so that doesn’t seem the case. She says “You will betray the men serving you, you will betray your family.” So far he’s only betrayed his family, he still needs to betray his men (and I think it will be Davos).

      He’s dead.

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    21. LatrineDiggerBrian: Calm down, my goodness. I’m not even a Stannis fan boy, I don’t give a shit if he’s dead or not. I just think he isn’t. The interview with Dillane made me more suspicious.

      What makes you believe that? Dillane said recently he was out of GoT for good, never enjoyed playing the part and was only in it for the money! Likewise his name didn’t appear in a list I saw somewhere on this site recently for the principle S6 cast members. So I reckon he’s ‘Brown Bread’ and that’s that! Perhaps that geezer being burned upside down on the cross in the trailer was Stannis? Hope it is and that would finally put an end to all these ‘Stannis is still alive’ comments.

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    22. Great comments in this thread! I’m really enjoying this walk down memory lane, what with not being able to commit the time to re-watch all the episodes before Season 6.

      The scenes that really stick out in my memory in this episode are Dany’s visions in the House of the Undying, and the marriage of Robb and Talisa. I was Unsullied when I first watched this episode, and even then without the knowledge of the Red Wedding coming next season, I knew Robb has just made a HUGE mistake. It’s interesting now to compare Robb’s decision to betray his oath to Walder Frey with Jon’s decision to deny Stannis’ offer of legitimacy. Both men are raised by the ever-honorable Ned Stark, but interestingly it’s his eldest legitimate son and heir that forsakes a sacred oath and his bastard son who refuses to do so.

      As for Dany and the House of the Undying, the only new thought I can add to the reflections here is that, now that her vision of Rhaegar and the prince that was promised didn’t make the cut, will we ever see Rhaegar in this series? I think it would be cool, but there might not be a situation for it to appear organically. I guess we just have to wait and see what Bran sees in his visions to come!

      That scene they added with Dany and Drogo was heart wrenching for sure…“If this is a dream than I will kill the man that tries to wake me.”

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    23. Black Raven: What makes you believe that?Dillane said recently he was out of GoT for good, never enjoyed playing the part and was only in it for the money!Likewise his name didn’t appear in a list I saw somewhere on this site recently for the principle S6 cast members. So I reckon he’s ‘Brown Bread’ and that’s that! Perhaps that geezer being burned upside down on the cross in the trailer was Stannis? Hope it is andthat would finally put an end to all these ‘Stannis is still alive’ comments.

      Possible he could’ve been lying? And maybe going to extremes to throw off the scent?

      I just look at that scene, and there is clear apprehension on Brienne’s part before she “kills” him. After he says “go on, do your duty” she pauses for a long while, then hesitantly pulls the sword out of the scabbard (you can tell by the sound it makes), then sort of waits there for a moment with an awkward look on her face before swinging the sword. So why would she hesitate? Gwendoline Christie is a great actress and wouldn’t have done that by accident, so she’s clearly being directed to do that. If she’s so blood thirsty for Stannis, why wouldn’t she just kill him without hesitation? Reason is, he’s a beat dog and she has more honor than that. Her sword swing missed just like John’s did when he swung at Ygritte to kill her.

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    24. There are a very few wise men in westeros and maester luwin was one of the wisest and perhaps one of the most honest , noble , humble. …I like the actor who played him…I saw him play max planck he was good as planck ,…….He was better as maester luwin ……

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    25. Surely leading his faithful men on a suicide charge after ignoring every sensible opportunity to turn back counts as a betrayal? He’s dead.

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    26. raw_bean:
      Surely leading his faithful men on a suicide charge after ignoring every sensible opportunity to turn back counts as a betrayal? He’s dead.

      I wouldn’t count that as a betrayal. They knew exactly what they were getting into and could’ve left if they wanted to (some did). Betrayal happens when a blatant lie is committed. Someone expects one thing based on the trust they hold in another person, and when they’re betrayed that trust is broken intentionally and they get something completely different.

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